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The BP share price is hit by global issues, but I’m not worried. Here’s why

first_img Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Having analysed stocks for a long time, I’m not unfamiliar with the expansive and sometimes obscure nature of cause and effect when it comes to investing. We all know that when a butterfly flaps its wings in Japan, in Silicon Valley a wind-power start-up sees its share price rise. But even so I have to admit it took me a second glance recently when I saw that BP (LSE: BP) was warning that the coronavirus could be set to hurt its profits.Oil demandThis comes about, of course, because of the impact the virus will be having on global oil demand, and particularly that of the massive oil-consuming powerhouse that is China. Earlier this month, the International Energy Agency (IEA) warned that crude and gas demand is expected to grow at its slowest rate since 2011 because the coronavirus outbreak is hitting Chinese consumption.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…In China, transport has been severely hit by official government quarantines, as well as the natural fall in demand for travel when outbreaks like this occur. This has also had a knock-on effect on Chinese industry itself, another major consumer of oil and oil derivatives.In times of plenty, perhaps the crude price wouldn’t see too much trouble from this kind of tragedy, but unfortunately for oil companies, the price of crude had already been suffering under pressures from oversupply. The concerns of the coronavirus may simply be the last straw that sends the price of crude to levels where oil producers struggle.But I believe that large oil companies such as BP are able to weather such oil-price storms. Revenues and profits may take a hit, but as a medium-to-long term investment, a bad year for the oil price usually isn’t of too much concern.The influence of OPEC is also something worth considering. As a group, OPEC tends not to be the subtlest in its reaction to low oil prices. I wouldn’t be surprised that with this added coronavirus factor hitting prices, its members will seen be cutting supply quotas very soon.The green moveBut if I think short-term issues shouldn’t worry investors, what about the long-term ones? A more fundamental concern for oil companies is, of course, the move away from crude products and into renewable energy. This is all taking place against a backdrop that means environmental concerns about carbon emissions make firms like BP the bad guys in many people’s eyes.But BP is acutely aware of this and is taking action. It’s no surprise that this month has seen it announce its intention to become carbon-neutral by 2050. This is apparently the most ambitious of such targets made by any mega-sized oil firm, though I suspect from an environmentalist’s perspective, it will do little to change public opinion of oil producers.Interestingly however, such pressures on oil firms are coming from investors themselves, both institutional and retail. The winds do seem to be changing, and though only a fool would argue we currently don’t live in a world that needs oil, the fact that the biggest players in the market are making efforts in the renewable space could be future-proofing them.As an investor, I’m not worried. Image source: Getty Images. Karl Loomes | Monday, 17th February, 2020 | More on: BP Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Sharescenter_img The BP share price is hit by global issues, but I’m not worried. Here’s why Karl has shares in BP. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Enter Your Email Address Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. See all posts by Karl Loomeslast_img read more

I think these FTSE 100 stocks are some of the best investments for 2020

first_img Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! See all posts by Rupert Hargreaves The FTSE 100 is stuffed full of bargains. I think many of these particular stocks could be some of the best investments of 2020. Companies, like the two listed below with substantial competitive advantages and large profit margins, look set to profit in a year dominated by the coronavirus. The best investments for 2020Online property portal Rightmove (LSE: RMV) is one of the most visited websites in the UK. At the beginning of the coronavirus crisis, the company reported a significant decline in activity on its sites as lockdown forced estate agents to shut up shop. 5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…However, activity has rebounded in recent weeks. Earlier this week, the company announced that the number of home sales on its site in July hit a 10-year record, beating the previous monthly record by 20%.Home prices jumped in almost every region, the site also noted. These figures suggest Rightmove is back in business, which is why I think it could be one of the best investments for 2020. While there are some concerns that this mini property boom could peter out towards the end of the year, the group’s position in the market should help it weather the storm. Rightmove is used by around 90% of the estate agents in the UK.Therefore, as long as the property market is moving, the company will be making money. Rightmove is also one of the most profitable businesses listed in London. It has a 70% profit margin and converts virtually all of its profit into cash, most of which management has been returning to investors with dividends and share buybacks. This gives the business a considerable cushion against sales declines as well.As such, as a way to play the UK economic recovery, I think Rightmove could be one of the best investments for 2020. Security demandAvast (LSE: AVST) also has desirable investment qualities. Shares in the security software provider have surged in value over the past year. The stock is up 75% over the past 12 months. Nevertheless, despite this performance, the stock looks cheap compared to its growth. City analysts are forecasting earnings growth of 46% this year. If the company hits this target, it will be one of the FTSE 100’s fastest-growing businesses. However, shares in the tech company are dealing at a forward price-to-earnings (P/E) multiple of just 22. The rest of the sector is trading at a multiple of 27. These numbers suggest shares in Avast offer a wide margin of safety at current levels. I also expect the company’s impressive growth to continue in the years ahead. The world is becoming increasingly reliant on technology.Unfortunately, criminals are looking to exploit this. Avast is one of the few publicly-listed cybersecurity businesses. It’s the only pure-play in the sector in the FTSE 100. Therefore, I think this is not only one of the best investment for 2020, but for the long term as well. Considering Avast’s current valuation, now could be a great time to snap up a share of this business while it offers a margin of safety.  Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Rupert Hargreaves owns no share mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Rightmove. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997”center_img I think these FTSE 100 stocks are some of the best investments for 2020 Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Image source: Getty Images Enter Your Email Address Rupert Hargreaves | Tuesday, 18th August, 2020 | More on: AVST RMV last_img read more

Six Nations: Five things Scotland learnt against Wales

first_img Scotland will be doing catching practise, and lots of itScotland have sorted the lineout to the level where it is a genuine threat rather than the possession drain it was, and the scrum is usually 50/50 against the teams we’ve played so far. But there are still some worrying basics that aren’t up to club level, let alone international.The current back three are massively ineffective under the high ball, regularly giving it away, knocking it forward or worse handing it to the opposition (Tommy Seymour is more reliable, but injured).On our own ball we could just stop kicking it, which would be incredibly sensible with the running threats we have. But teams are still going to target Stuart Hogg, Tim Visser and Sean Lamont with garryowens and if you have jumpers as good as Wales it’s a great way to improve territory.Greig Laidlaw is back to his old waysNever doubt the man’s heart – you can see it written on his face every time he plays for Scotland – but Greig Laidlaw is (again) dictating too slow a pace for Scotland. In the autumn the ball was swiftly away from the base, and Laidlaw offered an attacking threat. This week his two attempted runs were in the first ten minutes of the game. In both games he was crabbing sideways again and without extra time on the ball before the defence gets to him, Finn Russell’s game also suffers.Up the tempo: Sam Hidalgo-Clyne changed Scotland’s pace at 9It might just be that Laidlaw doesn’t suit the high-tempo game Vern Cotter is trying to get Scotland to play. Luckily there’s the confident and in-form Sam Hidalgo-Clyne waiting. He’s pacy, far more of an attacking threat, very handy off the tee and young enough that he’ll do what big Vern tells him to.It would mean finding a new captain; one who knows that taking the points on offer is not weakness, but a vote of confidence in your team to score next time too.Finn Russell still has much to learnThe young fly half had a very mixed game. He was still an attacking threat and put a few well-timed passes in that unlocked the Welsh defence. On the other hand there were too many poor kicks and that “tackle” on Dan Biggar. He overhit a simple tactical kick early on, and more crucially missed two penalty kicks to touch gifting Wales lifelines when Scotland had just overcome a suffocating spell after the half and were back in the match.The card incident has since seen him cited to appear in front of a disciplinary panel. Any ban could also see a new fly-half required to face Italy in two weeks just as we have found our man. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS It could be a test of his happy go-lucky nature.There must be some positivesWe have to learn something positive, don’t we? Warren Gatland said that was the toughest Scotland team Wales had encountered in his tenure, so I suppose we’ll take that. Three points is thankfully, less than last years margin, so we’ll take that too.Alex Dunbar is rapidly becoming indispensable; his battle with Roberts was huge. You can see the class starting to emerge in the young ranks of this team with every game.As a nation of supporters, Scotland fans are really very much over the plucky losers thing though, having been a team in development for about, well, 15 years. A win against Italy must be delivered not for the safety of Cotter’s job (In Vern We Trust), but just for our sanity.Time to reflect: Stuart Hogg asks about time at the final whistleOh, and one last thingI wasn’t going to mention some of referee Glen Jackson’s decisions, but then I spotted there were 5 seconds left on the clock… Okay, so the match clock quibbles were, in fact, dubious. Scotland did no help to their cause wasting time with a fracas and a lengthy kick preparation.For me, the main area of contention was his decision not to review either Laidlaw’s or Mark Bennett’s efforts at the end of each half. Neither were certain tries, but both were worth a look. Having shown two cards first half, one of which was debateable (the Davies one), I feel he should have been keener to penalise blatant Welsh cynicism as they tried to shut Scotland out, not least the high tackle on Hidalgo-Clyne preventing a near certain try. There was also a dangerous shoulder barge on Hogg’s spine by Gethin Jenkins earlier in the game that may warrant further attention, but likely won’t.Still, I’ve never forgiven Jackson for keeping Gordon Ross out of the Saracens team when he was a player. High and dry: Scotland were uncertain in many aerial contests We cannot blame the referee; Scotland blew more scoring chances to win the game than Jackson denied them.The March 2015 issue of Rugby World is packed with Six Nations features. Find out how to download it here and for the latest subscription offers click here.last_img read more

Charity Commission updates its governance guide

first_imgThe Charity Commission has published an updated version of its guide to effective governance, ‘The Hallmarks of an Effective Charity’. The publication clarifies the key principles that form the ‘Hallmarks’ of a well-run charity.The Commission says that the Hallmarks have been developed to be used by any charity to raise its standards and improve its effectiveness.The six Hallmarks of an effective charity are:* Hallmark 1 – Clear about purposes and direction: using its purposes, mission and values to direct all aspects of its work* Hallmark 2 – A strong board; having the right balance of skills and experience and clarity about its responsibilities and the interests of its beneficiaries* Hallmark 3 – Fit for purpose; having structures, policies and procedures in place to enable it to achieve its purposes* Hallmark 4 – Learning and improving; always assessing performance to improve its performance and to inform planning and future direction* Hallmark 5 – Financially sound and prudent; controlling and using financial and other resources to deliver its purposes* Hallmark 6 – Accountable and transparent, accounting to all those with an interest in it in a transparent and understandable way.The Hallmarks of an effective charity(CC10) can be downloaded from the Charity Commission’s website.www.charitycommission.gov.uk/publications/default.asp Tagged with: Charity Commission Law / policy Management Howard Lake | 7 July 2008 | News  28 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 Charity Commission updates its governance guidelast_img read more

Relatives of Omagh bomb victims to meet Northern Ireland secretary today

first_img Previous articleLocal man in serious condition after crash on Drumkeen to Stranorlar roadNext articleSinn Fein says more regular and accurate emigration figures must be provided News Highland By News Highland – June 18, 2012 Relatives of Omagh bomb victims to meet Northern Ireland secretary today Dail to vote later on extending emergency Covid powers Twitter Twitter Pinterest WhatsApp Facebook Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Google+ WhatsAppcenter_img News Pinterest Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR HSE warns of ‘widespread cancellations’ of appointments next week Man arrested in Derry on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences released Relatives of victims of the 1998 Omagh bombing are to meet the Northern Ireland secretary later to continue their campaign for a public inquiry.Twenty-nine people and unborn twins died in the Real IRA atrocity.The families say they will give Owen Paterson new evidence that authorities on both sides of the border could have prevented the bombing.No-one has been successfully criminally convicted of the bombing which devastated the County Tyrone town.Spokesperson for the relatives of the Omagh bomb victims, Michael Gallagher, said if the Secretary of State doesn’t call a public inquiry, the the families will go through the courts….[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/mg1pm.mp3[/podcast] Dail hears questions over design, funding and operation of Mica redress scheme PSNI and Gardai urged to investigate Adams’ claims he sheltered on-the-run suspect in Donegal Google+last_img read more

LIVE NOW- Webinar On “CRIMINALISING COMEDY AND CINEMA”

first_imgTop StoriesLIVE NOW- Webinar On “CRIMINALISING COMEDY AND CINEMA” LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK31 Jan 2021 5:29 AMShare This – xLiveLaw is organizing a webinar on ” Criminalising Comedy And Cinema” on Sunday, 6 PM.The details of the webinar are as follows:Topic: Criminalising Comedy And CinemaDate & Time: January 31,2021, 6PMPanelistsMr. Sanjay Hegde, Senior Advocate Supreme Court Of IndiaSanjay Rajoura, Stand Up ComedianAditi Mittal, Stand Up ComedianDaraab Farooqui, Film WriterModerator: Avani Bansal,…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginLiveLaw is organizing a webinar on ” Criminalising Comedy And Cinema” on Sunday, 6 PM.The details of the webinar are as follows:Topic: Criminalising Comedy And CinemaDate & Time: January 31,2021, 6PMPanelistsMr. Sanjay Hegde, Senior Advocate Supreme Court Of IndiaSanjay Rajoura, Stand Up ComedianAditi Mittal, Stand Up ComedianDaraab Farooqui, Film WriterModerator: Avani Bansal, Advocate Supreme Court of IndiaYouTube Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z99O5djZFKwFacebook Link: https://www.facebook.com/livelawindiaInstagram Link: https://www.instagram.com/livelaw.in/For inquiries, write to us at [email protected] or contact us at +91 7994869917.Next Storylast_img read more

Taxonomic affinities of dark septate root endophytes of Colobanthus quitensis and Deschampsia antarctica, the two native Antarctic vascular plant species

first_imgAlthough dark septate fungal endophytes (DSE) occur widely in association with plant roots in cold-stressed habitats, little is known of the taxonomic status of DSE in Antarctica. Here we investigate the phylogenetic affinities of DSE colonising the roots of Colobanthus quitensis and Deschampsia antarctica, the two maritime Antarctic vascular plant species. Two hundred and forty-three DSE were isolated from roots collected from 17 sites across a 1470 km transect through maritime and sub-Antarctica. The ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 nuclear ribosomal gene cluster of representative isolates was sequenced, and the sequences were recovered in 10 sequence groups and sub-groups. Nine of the sequence groupings could be placed in the Helotiales and the remaining one showed high homology to a large number of currently unassigned anamorphic ascomycete sequences. Of the Helotiales, Leptodontidium orchidicola, Rhizoscyphus ericae and species of Tapesia and Mollisia could be confidently identified. This study demonstrates that members of the Helotiales, including several widely-recognised DSE genera, commonly colonise the roots of C. quitensis and D. antarctica in the Antarctic.last_img read more

HO2NO2 and HNO3 in the coastal Antarctic winter night: A “lab-in-the-field” experiment

first_imgObservations of peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2) and nitric acid (HNO3) were made during a 4 month period of Antarctic winter darkness at the coastal Antarctic research station, Halley. Mixing ratios of HNO3 ranged from instrumental detection limits to ∼8 parts per trillion by volume (pptv), and of HO2NO2 from detection limits to ∼5 pptv; the average ratio of HNO3 : HO2NO2 was 2.0(± 0.6):1, with HNO3 always present at greater mixing ratios than HO2NO2 during the winter darkness. An extremely strong association existed for the entire measurement period between mixing ratios of the respective trace gases and temperature: for HO2NO2, R2 = 0.72, and for HNO3, R2 = 0.70. We focus on three cases with considerable variation in temperature, where wind speeds were low and constant, such that, with the lack of photochemistry, changes in mixing ratio were likely to be driven by adsorption/desorption mechanisms alone. We derived enthalpies of adsorption (ΔHads) for these three cases. The average ΔHads for HNO3 was −42 ± 7 kJ mol−1 and for HO2NO2 was −56 ± 3 kJ mol−1; these values are extremely close to laboratory-derived values. This exercise demonstrates (i) that adsorption to/desorption from the snow pack should be taken into account when addressing budgets of boundary layer HO2NO2 and HNO3 at any snow-covered site, and (ii) that Antarctic winter can be used as a~natural “laboratory in the field” for testing data on physical exchange mechanisms.last_img read more

Levi leads Texas Rio Grande Valley over Dixie State 72-65

first_img Associated Press Tags: Dixie State Trailblazers Basketball/Javon Levi/Texas-Rio Grande Valley Vaqueros/WAC FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailEDINBURG, Texas (AP) — Javon Levi had 16 points and 11 assists to lead five Texas Rio Grande Valley players in double figures as the Vaqueros got past Dixie State 72-65.Sean Rhea added 12 points for the Vaqueros. Chris Freeman chipped in 11 points. LaQuan Butler and Uche Dibiamaka had 10 points apiece.Cameron Gooden had 18 points for the Trailblazers (4-5, 0-2 Western Athletic Conference), whose losing streak reached four games. Written by January 16, 2021 /Sports News – Local Levi leads Texas Rio Grande Valley over Dixie State 72-65last_img read more

Half of foreign buy-to-let landlords have quit UK

first_imgHome » News » Housing Market » Half of foreign buy-to-let landlords have quit UK previous nextHousing MarketHalf of foreign buy-to-let landlords have quit UKCountrwide says its research shows the number of oversesas investors in the UK property market has dropped dramatically since 2010.Nigel Lewis17th July 201701,077 Views The number of foreigners who own buy-to-let properties in the UK has more than halved over the past seven years, it has been revealed.But despite this dramatic drop, they still earn £5.4 billion a year in rent half of which comes from London properties.Countrywide, which conducted the research, says this decline in the number of overseas landlords is down to both a steady increase in tax on property investors, and stalling capital growth particularly in London.“The growth of the private rented sector since 2010 has not been driven by overseas investors,” says Johnny Morris, Research Director at Countrywide (pictured, left).“As well as having to contend with increased stamp duty and the annual tax on enveloped dwellings (ATED), overseas investors also saw the removal of capital gains tax exemptions in 2015.”Countrywide also says the proportion of UK property owned by overseas landlords has dropped from 12% to 5%, a record low.And in Greater London the reduction has been more dramatic from 26% to 11%, the research says, while in prime Central London the proportion has dropped from nearly a third in 2010 to less than a quarter now.Asians largest groupCountrywide says the reduction is in part due to Europeans withdrawing from the London buy-to-let market, and that Asians now make up the largest proportion of foreign landlords in the capital at a third, followed by Europeans (28%) and Middle Easterns (9%).But outside London Europeans are the largest group of foreign landlords at 37%, although overall foreign buy-to-let investors have been withdrawing from the UK’s regional property markets since 2010, Countrywide says.Although 11% of buy-to-let property in London is owned by foreigners, outside the capital it is less than 5% in most regions including the South East. In Scotland, Wales and the Midlands only 3% of buy-to-let properties are foreign-owned.Countrywide also says that while the average rent in the UK rose by 1.1% in June, they dropped by 0.8% in London.“The fall in the capital was driven by lower rents in the outer areas of London as the ripple effect from falling rents in Central London continues,” says Johnny Morris.But outside the capital demand for rented property is pushing up rents, dramatically in some regions. For example, in the South West rents rose by 4.6% during June. Where London’s overseas landlords come fromAsia – 33% Europe – 28% North America – 10% Middle East – 9% Oz/Malaysia – 8% Africa – 7% South America – 5%  Johnny Morris Countrywide July 17, 2017Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more