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Stem cells

first_imgBy Stephanie SchupskaUniversity ofGeorgiaFour times Hamilton Jordan has battled cancer. Each time he’s diagnosed, he researches his disease and hopes for new treatments.The scientists, politicians and lawyers gathered on the University of Georgia campus Monday believe some of those treatment answers lie in stem cell research.”Life never meant so much to me over the last few years as the years when I’m fighting for it,” Jordan said as the former White House chief of staff shared his cancer stories.Stem cell research brings to mind images of lab coats and microscopes. But Monday’s symposium brought to light the legal, political and personal issues facing stem cell research. Lawyer Sherry Knowles, U.S. Congressman Tom Price and Jordan came to discuss their respective points of view.”These are three very important topics that will really determine how medicine will reach the public,” said Steve Stice, a Georgia Research Alliance eminent scholar and director of UGA’s Regenerative Bioscience Center.Every year, UGA holds a “Human Embryonic Stem Cell Toolbox” workshop, a five-day clinic sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. Participants come from as far away as Japan.The RBC then holds the symposium to “advance public knowledge and awareness of genetic medicine,” Stice said.Jordan, a key figure in President Jimmy Carter’s administration, was diagnosed with histiocytic lymphoma in 1985 after an X-ray showed a golf-ball-sized tumor in his chest.”The doctor said it was likely cancer,” he said. As he waited for the results of his biopsy, “my wife, mom and sister took turns crying for three days as I lay there.”After he was diagnosed, Jordan “went into a funk. I was scared to death. I kind of cut myself off from my family.”Then a doctor friend from UGA dropped by for a visit at the hospital and asked him: “Who is going to have a greater decision in your life than yourself?”That night, Jordan went down to the hospital’s library and started learning about his cancer.The personal side plays a huge role in the research. But researchers must also keep in mind the legal aspects of stem cells.As a partner at King and Spalding, Knowles focuses heavily on protecting biotechnology patent portfolios. “You can do all the research you want, but if you’re blocked by patents, you’ll get nowhere,” she told the scientists. “I help get companies and universities through the patent thicket.”As of June 2005, 1,400 patents covered the various aspects of stem cell research. That makes it all the more important for scientists to investigate what has been patented and to get the proper licenses before proceeding with studies.Although Rep. Tom Price (R-Ga.) is an orthopedic surgeon and third-generation physician, “I’m here to give you opinion,” he said. He believes that stem cells, whether embryonic or adult, hold great promise for many diseases and many illnesses. Then he went on to explain the political dilemma.”Politicians like unanimity,” he said. “We don’t like controversy. … We try to help people and make people happy.”And stem cell research, especially embryonic research, is controversial. “With adult and cord cell research, you get into the whole area of political demagoguery,” Price said. “Oftentimes it seems in embryonic stem cells that the secret to so many diseases is just months away. This does a disservice to the public, science and those suffering from diseases.”Plus, “the government is not nimble,” he said. “You can’t get us to move in such a way that responds quickly to issues.”He asked the scientists to educate their politicians, to invite them into the lab and explain their research. It helps to add a personal view to something as tiny as cells.”I look at every day differently than before I had these experiences,” Jordan said of his battles with cancer. To him, stem cell research is “important to our country, our people and our economy. There’s so much to lose here.”(Stephanie Schupska is a news editor with the University ofGeorgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

Cricket News Gambhir was insecure, Upton in new book; Gambhir says not hurt at all

first_imgUpton recalled how the left-handed opener would be in “agony” even after scoring a hundred and stressing more on the mistakes he might have made.Upton termed Gautam as someone who was wired towards the lower end of the optimism/pessimism scale if 100 stands for “uber-optimistic” and 0 stood for pessimistic.”Let’s say his range was 20 to 40 with 30 being normal. When he scored 150, he would be disappointed in not scoring 200.”Upton wrote that no matter what he and then coach Gary Kirsten did Gambhir was “negative and pessimistic.”Upton then explained the contradiction and myth associated with mental toughness.”Using popular notion of mental toughness, he was one of the weakest and mentally most insecure’ people I have worked with.”But at the same time, he was undoubtedly one of the best and most determined and successful Test batsmen in the world. Something he would prove yet again in 2011 World Cup final.”Upton then explained that positive self talk, which is “a pillar or sub-component of mental toughness — It would work for about 50 percent of them, those who are lucky enough to be wired on the optimistic side of the scale.”Gambhir’s response was, “I wanted myself and Indian team to be the best in the world. That’s why I was not satisfied even after scoring 100 as it has been mentioned in Paddy’s book. I see nothing wrong there. As a driven individual I have tried to raise the bar for myself alone.”In the same chapter, Upton wrote about former captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni’s “incredible emotional control”.”I would go as far as to say, with greatest respect for MS the man and the Cricketer, that it is not emotional control but the lack of access to emotions. MS is not wired as an emotional type. It’s almost as if he doesn’t have them; a performance enhancing gift from birth,” Upton wrote.He then put it in stark contrast with current captain Virat Kohli.”Imagine taking that trait as the ultimate characteristic of a mentally tough athlete and then try to prescribe it to someone as emotionally wired like his successor Virat Kohli.”Virat uses his visible and overt emotional charge to drive his success, whereas MS’s success is facilitated by his lack of emotional charge,” wrote Upton. New Delhi: Gautam Gambhir was “mentally the most insecure” but that didn’t deter him from becoming one of India’s most successful batsmen, former mental conditioning coach Paddy Upton writes in his newly-released book, an assertion that the feisty ex-opener doesn’t even find hurtful.Gambhir, who is a now a politician and competing from the East Delhi constituency, told PTI that he is confident that there is “no sinful intention in Upton’s views as he is a nice man and in any case his insecurities are well documented”.In his book ‘The Barefoot Coach’, Upton discussed the myth of mental toughness of elite sportsperson and how they react to situations.”I did some of my best and least effective mental conditioning work with Gautam Gambhir, the International Test Cricketer of the Year’ in 2009. I worked with him up until that time but I had little to do with him being named world’s best cricketer,” Upton writes in his book. highlights Gautam Gambhir says he is not at all hurt by what Pady Upton thinks. Gautam Gambhir will contest elections from East Delhi. Pady Upton is currently Rajasthan Royals’ head coach.  For all the Latest Sports News News, Cricket News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more