North of England receives rugby boost

first_imgThe squad, which was selected after players were assessed during a successful Divisional Festival at Broadstreet RFC near Coventry last weekend, includes George Trick, the son of former England and Bath winger David Trick, fly-half Charlie Wicks, son of former Chelsea, Derby County and Queens Park Rangers footballer  Steve Wicks, and flanker George Jeavons-Fellows, grandson of John Jeavons-Fellows, a former RFU representative on the International Rugby Board. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Tickets are available from:Club Office, Fylde RFC, Woodlands Memorial Ground, Blackpool Road, Lytham St Annes, Lancashire FY8 4EL. 01253 734733 or  [email protected] for the internationals at Macclesfield and Fylde and the Wellington Festival, between April 16 and 22, will begin at Abingdon School in Oxfordshire from February 22 to 25.The England selectors have named a squad of 76 players to take part in the development camp which will be followed by a further camp at Stowe School in Buckinghamshire from March 4 to 6.center_img England fans at the Six Nations game against Italy at Twickenham PROSPECTIVE ENGLAND rugby internationals of the future will be in action in the North West in two high profile matches in April.England Under 16s will play Italy Under 17s at Macclesfield’s Priory Park ground on Wednesday April 20 (3pm) and Wales Under 16s at Fylde’s Woodlands Memorial Ground on Sunday April 24 (2.30pm).Representing England Under 16s is a proud moment for any young rugby player and has proved an important first rung on the international ladder for a number of today’s England Elite and England Saxons squad members. Ben Foden, David Wilson, Joe Simpson, Joe Worsley, Andrew Sheridan, Danny Care  and Jonny Wilkinson, all members of the current England Elite squad, were all capped by England at Under 16 level.The current England Saxons squad contains an even stronger contingent of England Under 16 old boys , among them Anthony Allen, Dominic Waldouck, Duncan Bell, Jordan Crane, Andy Saull, Geoff Parling, George Robson, Graham Kitchener, Matt Mullan, Steve Borthwick, Ben Skirving, Manu Tuilagi, James Gaskell, Lee Mears,  Olly Morgan, Tom Rees, Mathew Tait and Rob Webber.George Squires, chairman of England 16 Group, said: “Playing for England Under 16s is an important first step into international rugby. When you talk to past players they always say how valuable that first international experience is, knowing what is like to prepare for an international and the emotion of representing your country. We are delighted to see that so many former England Under 16 internationals have now progressed into the England Elite and England Saxons squads and that many of them are also making their mark in the Aviva Premiership and the RFU Championship.”Ticket prices for the England v Wales Under 16 international at Fylde RFC on April 24 are: £5 adult; £2 concessions, including U16slast_img read more

New Zealand 22 Ireland 19: 2nd Test verdict

first_imgThere is hardly anything to criticise in this Irish performance. Their intensity was superb, their kick-chase excellent and their defence aggressive and sound. New Zealand lacked composure and made uncharacteristic errors, which they will be keen to cut out next week.In quotes – winnersNew Zealand captain Richie McCaw: “It is a relief to win, to be honest. We are pretty happy to get away with a win. These guys make you pay for the mistakes you make in Test footy. You have to cut the errors out and take your opportunities.”Brian O’Driscoll (centre) shows his despair after the final whistleIn quotes – losersIreland captain Brian O’Driscoll: “I am absolutely gutted. We had them in trouble a few times, but the scoreline still says an All Blacks’ victory, which is very difficult to take. There was a huge effort from Mike Ross, coming back after not having played for a lot of weeks. There was a huge work-rate from our pack to set the platform. I am very proud of the lads. We have one more shot next week now and we will take a huge amount from this game.”Top statsNew Zealand had more territory (62%) and possession (59%) but conceded ten turnovers and made eight handling errors. Ireland fans celebrate their team’s early try, but their dreams of victory turned to dustBy Katie Field, Rugby World writerIn a nutshellRarely will you see a more dramatic Test match than this. Ireland hadn’t beaten New Zealand in 25 previous attempts spread over 107 years and a magnificent effort in Christchurch took them within a whisker of that first win (or even a second draw), but they were denied at the death. Ireland led 10-0 before New Zealand fought back to 16-10 up, but the scores were locked at 19-19 until Dan Carter snatched victory for the All Blacks with a drop-goal inside the last minute.Ireland played with so much more intensity than last week, forcing New Zealand into uncharacteristic errors. The Irish pack’s work at the breakdown was immense, Jonathan Sexton, Ronan O’Gara and Conor Murray controlled the game well and the All Blacks looked increasingly jittery as the tourists came back from 19-13 down to 19-19 inside the last quarter.Then, with New Zealand down to 14 men after Israel Dagg was sin-binned for a nasty late hit on Rob Kearney, referee Nigel Owens penalised Ireland for wheeling a scrum inside the home half, and suddenly New Zealand rediscovered their clinical edge when it counted most. They took play to the shadow of the Ireland posts and, after Carter fluffed one drop-goal attempt, they were awarded a five-metre scrum and Test rugby’s world record points-scorer added another three to his total with his next drop-goal effort. With less than half a minute on the clock, Ireland had no time to come back and so lost in the cruellest fashion.Dan Carter slotted the winning drop-goal in the last minuteNo one in the sell-out 21,000 crowd at the new AMI Stadium, built after Christchurch’s devastating 2011 earthquake, can have seen a more dramatic Test match, nor a better Ireland performance. Somehow the tourists now need to put this disappointment behind them and take the multitude of positives this game offers, and go all out for the win in the third and final Test next week. They have nothing to fear.Key momentReferee Nigel Owens refereed the breakdown strongly and evenly all evening but sadly his game will be remembered for a call inside the last five minutes which allowed New Zealand to turn defence into attack and snatch the win. Ireland had been on top in the scrum, but Owen penalised them for deliberately wheeling a scrum inside the hosts’ half and the All Blacks kicked for touch, attacked from the lineout and ultimately set the platform for the winning drop-goal. Scrum-calls at vital times are always controversial and only a handful of people know what was really happening in there, so opinion will remain divided on this one for years to come.Star manThere were so many outstanding performances from Ireland players, not least their front row. Mike Ross was immense, coming back into the side after several weeks on the sidelines, Rory Best had a terrific game, but Cian Healy just edges the decision for me with his storming play in the tight and loose. He even found time to square up to semi-professional boxer Sonny Bill Williams. Jamie Heaslip was another standout performer, Donnacha Ryan won some lovely lineouts, and Brian O’Driscoll led his team magnificently, characteristically playing bravely on after taking a blow close to his left eye early in the game.Room for improvement Sin-bin Israel Dagg 72IRELAND: Rob Kearney; Fergus McFadden, Brian O’Driscoll (captain), Gordon D’Arcy (Ronan O’Gara 50), Andrew Trimble; Jonathan Sexton, Conor Murray (Eoin Reddan 64); Cian Healy, Rory Best, Mike Ross, Dan Tuohy (Donncha O’Callaghan 58), Donnacha Ryan, Kevin McLaughlin (Peter O’Mahony 62), Sean O’Brien, Jamie Heaslip.Try Murray. Con Sexton. Pens Sexton 4 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img NEW ZEALAND: Israel Dagg; Zac Guildford, Conrad Smith, Sonny Bill Williams, Julian Savea (Ben Smith 73); Daniel Carter, Aaron Smith (Piri Weepu 64); Tony Woodcock, Andrew Hore, Owen Franks (Ben Franks 57), Brodie Retallick (Ali Williams 64), Sam Whitelock, Adam Thomson (Retallick 65-69), Richie McCaw (captain), Kieran Read (Sam Cane 40).Try Aaron Smith. Con Carter.  Pens Carter 4. Drop-goal Carter. NOT FOR FEATURED: Ireland fans celebrate a try against New Zealand during their rugby union match at AMI Stadium in Christchurch on June 16, 2012. The All Blacks beat Ireland 22-19 in the second rugby Test. AFP PHOTO / Marty Melville (Photo credit should read Marty Melville/AFP/GettyImages) last_img read more

FREE Season 2013-14 guide

first_imgTeam guide: every Aviva Premiership and RaboDirect Pro12 club is profiled in this free digital magazineHERE AT Rugby World we’ve decided to give you all a new season treat! We’ve put together a 36-page digital guide to the 2013-14 season – and we’re giving it to you for FREE!Every Aviva Premiership and RaboDirect Pro12 club is profiled while Stuart Barnes and Paul Wallace offer their expert opinions on who will fly and who will flop over the coming months. Ahead of the start of the Heineken Cup, we also bring you iconic images from throughout the tournament’s history.To download your free 36-page digital magazine simply click here and enter your email address. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Click to launch the full edition in a new window.last_img read more

Six Nations: Five things Scotland learnt against Wales

first_img Scotland will be doing catching practise, and lots of itScotland have sorted the lineout to the level where it is a genuine threat rather than the possession drain it was, and the scrum is usually 50/50 against the teams we’ve played so far. But there are still some worrying basics that aren’t up to club level, let alone international.The current back three are massively ineffective under the high ball, regularly giving it away, knocking it forward or worse handing it to the opposition (Tommy Seymour is more reliable, but injured).On our own ball we could just stop kicking it, which would be incredibly sensible with the running threats we have. But teams are still going to target Stuart Hogg, Tim Visser and Sean Lamont with garryowens and if you have jumpers as good as Wales it’s a great way to improve territory.Greig Laidlaw is back to his old waysNever doubt the man’s heart – you can see it written on his face every time he plays for Scotland – but Greig Laidlaw is (again) dictating too slow a pace for Scotland. In the autumn the ball was swiftly away from the base, and Laidlaw offered an attacking threat. This week his two attempted runs were in the first ten minutes of the game. In both games he was crabbing sideways again and without extra time on the ball before the defence gets to him, Finn Russell’s game also suffers.Up the tempo: Sam Hidalgo-Clyne changed Scotland’s pace at 9It might just be that Laidlaw doesn’t suit the high-tempo game Vern Cotter is trying to get Scotland to play. Luckily there’s the confident and in-form Sam Hidalgo-Clyne waiting. He’s pacy, far more of an attacking threat, very handy off the tee and young enough that he’ll do what big Vern tells him to.It would mean finding a new captain; one who knows that taking the points on offer is not weakness, but a vote of confidence in your team to score next time too.Finn Russell still has much to learnThe young fly half had a very mixed game. He was still an attacking threat and put a few well-timed passes in that unlocked the Welsh defence. On the other hand there were too many poor kicks and that “tackle” on Dan Biggar. He overhit a simple tactical kick early on, and more crucially missed two penalty kicks to touch gifting Wales lifelines when Scotland had just overcome a suffocating spell after the half and were back in the match.The card incident has since seen him cited to appear in front of a disciplinary panel. Any ban could also see a new fly-half required to face Italy in two weeks just as we have found our man. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS It could be a test of his happy go-lucky nature.There must be some positivesWe have to learn something positive, don’t we? Warren Gatland said that was the toughest Scotland team Wales had encountered in his tenure, so I suppose we’ll take that. Three points is thankfully, less than last years margin, so we’ll take that too.Alex Dunbar is rapidly becoming indispensable; his battle with Roberts was huge. You can see the class starting to emerge in the young ranks of this team with every game.As a nation of supporters, Scotland fans are really very much over the plucky losers thing though, having been a team in development for about, well, 15 years. A win against Italy must be delivered not for the safety of Cotter’s job (In Vern We Trust), but just for our sanity.Time to reflect: Stuart Hogg asks about time at the final whistleOh, and one last thingI wasn’t going to mention some of referee Glen Jackson’s decisions, but then I spotted there were 5 seconds left on the clock… Okay, so the match clock quibbles were, in fact, dubious. Scotland did no help to their cause wasting time with a fracas and a lengthy kick preparation.For me, the main area of contention was his decision not to review either Laidlaw’s or Mark Bennett’s efforts at the end of each half. Neither were certain tries, but both were worth a look. Having shown two cards first half, one of which was debateable (the Davies one), I feel he should have been keener to penalise blatant Welsh cynicism as they tried to shut Scotland out, not least the high tackle on Hidalgo-Clyne preventing a near certain try. There was also a dangerous shoulder barge on Hogg’s spine by Gethin Jenkins earlier in the game that may warrant further attention, but likely won’t.Still, I’ve never forgiven Jackson for keeping Gordon Ross out of the Saracens team when he was a player. High and dry: Scotland were uncertain in many aerial contests We cannot blame the referee; Scotland blew more scoring chances to win the game than Jackson denied them.The March 2015 issue of Rugby World is packed with Six Nations features. Find out how to download it here and for the latest subscription offers click here.last_img read more

England v Ireland Talking Points – Grand Slam secured at Twickenham

first_imgIreland were better in every facet, as they have been in every game of this championship, and the 24-15 scoreline flatters England thanks to Jonny May’s late try.Clinical, physical, composed, organised, accurate, smart – there are myriad adjectives to describe these Ireland Grand Slammers, and Man of the Match Tadhg Furlong epitomises them all.Joe Schmidt has built a team that can play in different ways and has much more depth than we saw at the last World Cup. They are advancing towards Japan 2019 with a bounce in their step.England, in contrast, are stuttering and the three-Test tour to South Africa in June is taking on ever more importance. Can they get back on track against the Springboks? We’ll have to wait a few months to find out.First, here are the big talking points from Twickenham…Kicking threatsPeople talk about players being dangerous with ball in hand but at Twickenham we saw a mix of kicks coming to the fore.Johnny Sexton’s high ball resulted in a try for Garry Ringrose in the sixth minute. Rob Kearney and Anthony Watson jumped for it, the TMO ruled that Watson had knocked on – although later replays hinted that Kearney’s hand may have knocked the ball forward first – and Ringrose came through to touch the ball down.Quick work: Garry Ringrose pouces on the loose ball to score (Getty Images)England’s first-half try came from an Owen Farrell grubber behind the Ireland defence and over the line. Keith Earls was forced to turn and Elliot Daly beat the Irishman to the ball.Then came Jacob Stockdale’s finish as the clocked ticked past the 40-minute mark. Conor Murray somehow got the ball away to Stockdale on the wing and he chipped over Mike Brown and Jonny May. The ball deflected off Stockdale’s knee as May and Brown tried to bring him down, but the Irishman managed to work his way clear and ground the ball just before the dead-ball line.Try time: Elliot Daly gathers Owen Farrell’s grubber kick to score (Getty Images)England had apparently asked for the dead-ball area to be extended for this game and the blue line was clearly a good metre or so further back than the original white one, giving Stockdale that extra time to touch down. They might now regret that decision!England improvementsThere was more intensity – and endeavour – to this England performance than we saw in Paris. They were much better at the breakdown, supporting carriers to ensure they were more likely to retain possession, and built phases into double figures too. England v Ireland Talking Points – Grand Slam secured at TwickenhamIreland won only the third Grand Slam in their history with this comprehensive win over England at Twickenham to round out their 2018 Six Nations campaign.Rory Best’s side had scored their first try within six minutes, had their third by half-time, and despite an improved England performance from Paris, wrapped up a clean sweep to go with those of 1948 and 2009.Related: What is a Grand Slam?Another bright stat from an Ireland perspective was Jacob Stockdale taking his championship tally to seven tries, more than any other player has scored in a single Six Nations.Eyes on the prize: Jacob Stockdale chases the ball to score his first-half try (Getty Images)As for England, this is the first time they have lost three games in a Six Nations campaign since 2006 and it’s their first home defeat in the championship since 2012. Even more damning, England finished fifth in the table – their worst finish since the tournament expanded to include six teams. Related: France v England talking pointsKyle Sinckler and Ben Te’o were direct in their runs, but again England struggled to break the gain-line and burst through the green wall constructed with such efficiency by Ireland defence coach Andy Farrell.Felled: Ben Te’o is brought down by the Ireland defence (Getty Images)It was actually the introduction of George Ford at fly-half, with Owen Farrell moving to 12, that saw England find more rhythm in attack and space out wide. They spread the ball along the line fast and Elliot Daly did find the room to score his second try in the final quarter after a neat offload from Mike Brown. Jonny May followed in the last minute, although England had butchered a couple of overlaps prior to that.Yet England’s ill-discipline let them down once more…Silly penaltiesOwen Farrell’s late charge on Rob Kearney as he cleared from his 22 resulted in the Ireland penalty that led to the position to set up their opening try for Garry Ringrose.Maro Itoje then conceded a penalty for grabbing Dan Leavy at the lineout – this after a free-kick and penalty concession by England at the scrum. That Itoje penalty allowed Ireland to build the phases inside England’s half and create the try for Jacob Stockdale at the end of the first half.Rising high: Maro Itoje contests a lineout with James Ryan (Getty Images)As England were building phases in the Ireland 22 at the start of the second half, Elliot Daly was penalised for a high roll on Kearney at a breakdown, allowing the visitors to clear.It was England’s needless and silly penalties that allowed Ireland to set up try-scoring opportunities – or scuppered their own chances.That Bundee Aki tackle In the 26th minute, with England pressurising in the Irish 22, a Bundee Aki tackle on Elliot Daly was sent to the TMO to review for potential foul play. Daly had already been tackled low and was falling when Aki came in with a big shoulder hit, wrapping one arm but not the other.TMO Ben Skeen ruled that he did lead with the shoulder but it was only a penalty offence. The England fans were disappointed it was not a yellow card, or even a red, but there was a sin-binning a couple of minutes later as England opted to go for a series of five-metre lineouts as Ireland conceded penalties.Peter O’Mahony was sent to the naughty step for collapsing a maul but England’s long throw at the next lineout was pinched by Ireland.The choice of lineouts rather than posts was odd considering this game was about winning, not scoring four tries like it was last week in Paris. And against France they went for the posts when they needed a bonus point. An interesting mindset – but one the crowd appreciated.Post office: CJ Stander grounds the ball against the post for a try (Getty Imagres)The weatherThe forecast of snow on St Patrick’s Day had led to the Twickenham groundstaff painting the pitch markings blue. The snow did fall but it didn’t settle, so the blue lines weren’t actually required – although one did come into play for the Jacob Stockdale first-half try.The chilly temperature didn’t seem to cool the spirits of the crowd. There were quiet periods around the stadiums but also plenty of chants from both sets of supporters. And the Irish fans in the crowd stayed behind for the trophy presentation and lap of honour.England – Tries: Daly 2, May.Ireland – Tries: Ringrose, Stander, Stockdale. Cons: Sexton 2, Carbery. Pens: Murray. St Patrick’s party: Ireland celebrate their Grand Slam (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Yellow card: O’Mahony (29min).Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. What you need to know about Ireland’s 24-15 win over England at Twickenham in the final round of the 2018 Six Nationslast_img read more

Five things we learnt about rugby in January 2020

first_imgCurrently, there’s less space on a rugby field than in a studio flat in Clapham, so fewer substitutions would mean more tired players – and tired players mean more gaps in the defensive line.The issues of the collision forces in rugby are well known and it has been exacerbated by allowing eight fresh monsters to replace eight tired monsters after around 55 minutes – fresh players running into tired players is a mathematical formula for injury.Limited substitutions will also mean that many players will have to play the full 80 minutes and therefore prioritise fitness over mass. But perhaps the greatest benefit of limiting substitutions is that it will reduce the benefits of rugby’s ‘buying culture’.Fewer substitutions will minimise the importance of the bench and allow a more level playing field for smaller clubs and Test nations. In modern rugby it is always the bench that makes the difference, particularly at international level. Beaumont is bang on the money with his suggestion.Related: Should there be fewer substitutions in rugby? Bristol are the new model for spendingThe days of English Premiership clubs being able to stack their entire squads with Test players appear to be over. That recruitment model simply isn’t affordable under the current salary cap and having a depth chart that is deeper than the Mariana Trench is going to attract some weird glances in the future.It is in this regard that Bristol seem to be changing the way that elite teams need to spend their money. Yes, they have signed some premium players in Semi Radradra and Kyle Sinckler. But they also have their fair share of ‘own brand’ players. TAGS: Harlequins Alex Dombrandt is a classical No 8If Rembrandt had painted a No 8, it would have been Alex Dombrandt. He is a classical eight: 6ft 3in tall, 18-and-a-half stone, the type of acceleration that could flatten a loose stone wall. But whilst the Harlequins back-row has the appearance and grunt of a textbook ball-carrier, his handling is from a different book altogether.He has been dominant in every appearance this season, but his work in the build-up to Danny Care’s try against Saracens was insane. Catching the ball from the back of the lineout, he cleverly passed an inside ball and left the first defender motionless. Then he managed to stay on Care’s shoulder, where he received one more pass before holding off the second tackler and finally executing a perfect reverse offload. Power surge: Alex Dombrandt makes a break for Harlequins (Getty Images) If primetime Sergio Parisse or Zinzan Brooke had done this, the world would be in awe. Dombrandt is the real deal. And whilst he isn’t in the England squad just yet, he will be.Rugby has had its ‘expenses’ scandalThere was a time when Members of Parliament could claim for seemingly anything on top of their salary. Additional properties, stables for their horses, little hats for their ducks. But British politics’ gravy train came to halt. And now, hopefully, rugby’s has too.Sign of times: A Gloucester fan references the Saracens salary cap scandal (Getty Images)Saracens have been dealt with, and rightly so. But the issue is so much bigger than just one club in England. Cheating the books is cheating the long-term health of the game. You need only look at the starting line-ups for the South African Super Rugby squads to realise just how unbalanced the global game is becoming at club level.Related: Saracens relegated from Premiership – and docked further 70 pointsPaying players good money for short careers is obviously a worthwhile goal. Modern rugby’s players pay a heavy physical price for their career choice and the renumeration should be commensurate with that. However, wages for individuals cannot take precedence over the good of the global game. Rugby is a sport that means a lot, to a lot of people. To adapt a political slogan, rugby should be ‘for the many, not the few’.Bill Beaumont is right on fewer substitutionsRugby has become an incredibly progressive game, but sometimes you need to step backwards to move forward and that is exactly what Bill Beaumont is proposing. Limiting the number of fresh substitutes in rugby would be a great move for the game and for many reasons. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS They have essentially chosen to build a squad based on expensive seniors and affordable juniors. What’s more they’re playing some of the most exciting rugby in the game. Bristol Bears are very much the future of English club rugby.Welsh rugby is recruiting cleverlyWhilst we’ve all been focusing on what patterns Wayne Pivac and Stephen Jones will be executing on the field, Welsh rugby has been doing some Carlos Spencer-type moves behind the scenes.Firstly, they manage to secure Nick Tompkins and put him straight into the Wales squad. But, perhaps more importantly, they’re starting to lure some of the Welsh youngsters who leaked through the talent pipeline back to Wales. Sam Costelow has signed with the Scarlets and Sam Moore has joined Cardiff Blues. Welsh rugby has been ringing its hands in recent years over the exodus of young Welsh players into the public school system in south-west England, but it has been rather clever in its approach.Welsh rugby is essentially letting the private schools train and educate them to a high standard, then when they’re ready the Welsh recruitment drive begins. With stacks of young talent already featuring at Gloucester and Bristol, it will be interesting to see who else comes back in future seasons. Paul Williams reflects on rugby’s recent goings-on, from recruitment to scandals The March 2020 issue of Rugby World magazine – a Six Nations special – is on sale now.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

How far off is a top rugby documentary series?

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The Last Dance and Drive to Survive are both available on Netflix (pics via Getty Images) How far off is a top rugby documentary series?“We’re speaking to people in rugby all the time,” says James Gay-Rees when asked about the prospect of a breakout rugby documentary series on a big streaming platform. The Oscar and BAFTA-winning producer behind garlanded works like Amy, Senna, and Diego Maradona, he and his colleagues at high-end sports media group Box To Box Films are preparing for the release of their third series of Formula 1: Drive To Survive in partnership with Netflix.So when he says that he believes “there is an appetite in rugby to do something now, in the right way”, it is worth taking note of.In the April edition of Rugby World, we have a feature entitled Rugby’s Fight For Gen Z, where we explore the sport’s approach to wooing a younger audience – and how that compares with competitors in a tough sports marketing landscape. As part of researching the piece, we spoke with the team at Box To Box about how they approached their project in F1 and if there is anything rugby can learn from the partnership.With Drive To Survive into a third series – released on Netflix on 19 March – the team can reflect on progress made. Today they feel that they have helped the sport enact a shift in interest, bringing in younger fans who have fallen for the narrative style of the show; embracing characters brought to the forefront.Admittedly pulling out such stories can be a happy accident. In series one of the show, without the buy-in from some of the major teams in the sport, they ended up focussing on the personalities tied up in the midfield battle as teams jostled for position. So clear was the storytelling in the run that by season two, the big dogs wanted to be a part of it.In the last few years, others have noticed the power of sports documentaries too. But delivering something that appeals to the major global streaming brands as much as it does to bored sports fans is easier said than done.“The problem that we’re facing in our business at the moment is that things partly like Drive to Survive but more things like The Last Dance have made a rod for everybody’s back,” Gay-Rees says. “Because they just want massive, massive pieces of IP (this can refer to ‘intellectual property’, but also anything covered by copyright or trademark). So we literally can have monthly conversations with the Amazons and Apples and Netflixes and they’re like, ‘Yeah, but can you get Tyson, can you get Federer, can you get Liverpool FC?’In the April issue we look at rugby’s fight for Gen Z“In terms of that big global play, we’ve just done a really amazing boxing show for Showtime in the US, so there’s an appetite for things on different channels. But people are under the illusion that Netflix are going to ride into town with a massive cheque for any sporting property and they’re just not going to.”We have of course seen rugby documentaries before. In recent times we had the All Blacks’ All or Nothing series on Amazon and SuperSport’s Chasing the Sun doc with the World Cup-winning Springboks (now available via Showmax). And then there is the Living With Lions documentary from behind the scenes of the 1997 British & Irish Lions tour, still seen by many in rugby as the gold standard.In the summer of 2020, it was also announced that the Lions and South Africa planned to join forces for a  behind-the-scenes documentary, looking inside both teams’ camps in 2021. It has been sold as the first Lions tour film shot from both perspectives. If such a venture goes ahead, the important detail is where it can be shown – and ultimately streamed.Gay-Rees talks about the crossover appeal of Senna and Drive to Survive, with tales of unexpected demographics becoming fans of both. As well as doing more to cater for existing fans, rugby must also want to find those new enthusiasts.Related: Does rugby need superstar names to challenge global market? Can’t get to the shops? Download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet. Subscribe to the print edition for magazine delivery to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.center_img We talk to the producers of F1’s Drive to Survive series about potential rugby documentaries Getting everyone to see the vision and wholeheartedly buying in is another issue entirely, though. As Gay-Rees explains: “These things are really hard to make interesting, because either you didn’t get the right access, or you’re getting spun too much. And that’s really our job.“You don’t know what the narrative is until you get in there. Obviously there’s the sporting narrative, which is who won, but that’s kind of irrelevant. What’s really interesting is, what’s the story underneath the story? And that can be anything.The 2017 All Blacks featured in Amazon’s All or Nothing franchise (Getty Images)“We always work that out, if we are given the tools to work that out. It’s always a leap of faith from both sides. They will let you in and you can work out what the narrative is. And then you’ve got to sell it back to them. It’s ‘So actually the series is about this,’ while they say, ‘Okay, we thought it was gonna be a highlight reel,’ you know? Well nobody wants to watch a  highlights reel because they’ve already seen it.”Necessity is the mother of invention. Formula 1, by its very nature, can be a secretive sport. Yet in making the first series of Drive to Survive, the production team found that some of the best stuff they could get was from candid conversations being captured on radio mics. They had all the footage of the midfield battles but with broadcasters often keeping up with the lead cars, sometimes they had to stitch in some additional commentary on the characters they were following.And while not being able to see drivers’ faces will always be an issue for the sport, they have been able to capitalise on new camera angles. As the Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA) moved the onboard cameras that would monitor drivers’ head and neck movements in case there was ever a crash, there was suddenly a new angle for the producers to use in the show.Rugby World Cup 2023 is beginning to loom large (Getty Images)As we hurtle beyond the upcoming British & Irish Lions tour, perhaps the big streaming houses will see the value in covering an event like the Rugby world Cup in France. If they did, you just hope it is done properly.“It just needs somebody to get inside and investigate it and then sell it back to an audience in a really dynamic way because it’s got it all,” Gay-Rees says. “You’ve got great characters, you’ve got real stakes, the physicality is amazing, the athleticism is amazing. It’s punchy, rugby, and it just needs to be repackaged a little.“I want to watch that show though, which goes behind the scenes of a rugby set-piece, and you go, ‘F*** me, that’s hardcore.’”The desire is definitely there. As the documentarian adds: “I’m definitely putting us in the frame for it.”This piece is tied with out Rugby’s Fight For Gen Z feature in the current issue of Rugby World.last_img read more

Southwestern Virginia diocese adds fifth nominee for bishop

first_imgSouthwestern Virginia diocese adds fifth nominee for bishop Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Tags Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Elections Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs [Episcopal News Service] The Standing Committee of the Episcopal Diocese of Southwestern Virginia has announced that the Rev. David Cox has been added by petition to its slate of four nominees to stand for election as the diocese’s sixth bishop.Cox, 65, is the rector of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Hot Springs, Virginia. His nomination makes him the sole priest of the diocese on the slate.The other nominees are:The Very Rev. Mark Bourlakas, 49, dean of Christ Church Cathedral in Louisville, Kentucky;The Rev. Jeanne Finan, 62, rector of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Asheville, North Carolina;The Rev. Gail Greenwell, 57, rector of St. Michael and All Angels in Mission, Kansas; andThe Rt. Rev. David Rice, 51, bishop of the Diocese of Waiapu in the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia.Detailed information about all the nominees is available here.The nominees will visit with members of the diocese March 1-3.The bishop election will take place on March 9 at St. John’s Episcopal Church in Roanoke and the ordination is scheduled for July 20.The sixth bishop will succeed the Rt. Rev. Neff Powell, who has served as the diocese’s fifth bishop since 1996. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls By ENS staffPosted Feb 6, 2013 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA center_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PAlast_img read more

Colombia: Bogota church hosts medical brigade clinic for the poor

first_imgColombia: Bogota church hosts medical brigade clinic for the poor Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Rector Pittsburgh, PA Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Anglican Communion, Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group [Episcopal Diocese of Colombia] The Divine Savior Episcopal Church in Bogota, located in one of the poorest sections of the city, recently hosted a medical (brigade) clinic on a Saturday. Clinic services included an opportunity to visit with a doctor or nurse, receive physical or respiratory therapy, or receive dental care.For a fee of COP$1,000, or a little over 50 US cents, visitors could gain access to the lower floor and take advantage of any of the medical services. A pharmacy also was available to pick up any recommended medication.In addition to the clinic, a used clothing store was set up. For a fee of COP$1,000, visitors could shop for jackets, pants, shirts, dresses, shoes, children’s clothing, and more. And on the first floor, located in the chapel, haircuts were being offered.Since the poor often face legal challenges that can be daunting, a lawyer also was available in the sanctuary for free consultations.When departing, all attendees received a gift bag with a bar of soap and a tube of toothpaste.All of the professional staff members were volunteers. They served a total of 90 people over a period of 6 hours.The fees, while basic and insufficient for covering the actual cost of the services, provided the participants with a sense of dignity, knowing that they had contributed something for the services they received.Founded in 1963, the Diocese of Colombia is the youngest diocese in the Episcopal Church and one of seven Province IX dioceses spread across the Caribbean and Central and northern South America. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Province IX An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Latin America, Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Health & Healthcare, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Press Release Service Posted Jul 15, 2013 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books last_img read more

Church in Africa adapts too slowly to youth ministry, say…

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The church is not moving fast enough to address the needs of young AnglicansPhoto: Bellah Zulu/ACNS[Anglican Communion News Service] Anglican youth leaders from southern Africa have called for urgent and practical action from the church to adapt to youth ministry.“The church has been too slow in terms of putting structures in place,” said the Rev. Robert Sihubwa, youth coordinator for the Church of the Province of Central Africa. “While we acknowledge the verbal commitment, the lack of funding commitments indicates slow movement.”Tony Lawrence is the provincial youth coordinator for the Anglican Church of Southern Africa. He told ACNS, “Changing our approaches and actively focusing on the ministry to children and young people is critical for the growth and survival of the church.”“Firstly, if we are serious about the continuance of the church as we know it through post modernism, then we will have to start thinking about moving the children and youth ministries to the center of all that we do as a Church,” he said.Young people on the continent have repeatedly called for more commitment and training from Church leaders over the issue of youth ministry. Yes they say their concerns are not being heard.In June this year, some young people in the Zambian Diocese of Lusaka decided to run their own church services after feeling disconnected from adult-led ones. Sihubwa reports that at least three parishes in the diocese are “holding their own services at least once per month.”“There is need for a youth church by allowing the young people to have a service of their own with a singing style different from the traditional way,” said Sihubwa. “They need to have a youth pastor and not just a youth chaplain who can attend directly to their needs.”Lawrence said, “The church maybe too locked into one historical way of doing church and too scared to venture out of our comfort zones to help young people express their worship and service in ways that make sense to them.”He added, “This is not to say that the old way is outdated but that the way we used to do it may not serve the youths well enough, and we need to explore additional ways of worship and church involvement.”Young Anglicans also argue that while the church seems to be willing to embrace change, there has not been any coordinated approach to train youths on the continent.“Some people are ready for the change but there is no investment to help actualize the change,” revealed Sihubwa. “For instance, we need to invest more in youth leadership training and that of Sunday school teachers.”But his Southern Africa counterpart thinks that even clergy need better training in ministry to children and young people. “They have yet to grapple with the concept of child theology because you cannot use the same methodologies to teach the truth of our faith for all the ages.“For instance, most of our churches cannot be adapted to accommodate small groups or classes for Sunday school because it is difficult to move the pews and this impacts on the quality of the learning that will take place,” said Lawrence.He added, “Additionally, the lack of training of clergy means that they in turn don’t know how to develop lay leadership that will be able minister to the young effectively and create a conducive environment for them to voice their concerns or ideas.”Lawrence concluded that Sunday school and youth ministry have always been regarded as an “add-on ministry not worthy of much priority and attention” and that for youth ministry to receive much appreciation and support it “must move to the center of our parochial ministry.” Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Rector Albany, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Anglican Communion, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 center_img Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Church in Africa adapts too slowly to youth ministry, say leaders Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Youth Minister Lorton, VA Youth & Young Adults This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL By Bellah ZuluPosted Sep 12, 2013 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Rector Bath, NC Africa, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 last_img read more