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Saint Mary’s lecture series to celebrate St. Teresa of Avila

first_imgKeri O’Mara | The Observer The Center for Spirituality (CFS) at Saint Mary’s announced its spring 2015 lecture series entitled “Saint Teresa of Avila: Carmelite Mystic and Doctor of the Church.”The series will include two talks and one panel discussion, marking the 500th anniversary of Saint Teresa’s birth. According to a press release, the Saint Mary’s College Annual Endowed Lecture Series Fund will sponsor the lectures, which are free and open to the public and will take place in the Vander Vennet Theatre.According to Michelle Egan, associate director of the CFS, the center hosts a series each fall and spring semester encompassing a specific topic or theme.This spring series will follow the 2014 lecture series, “Unitas, Veritas, Caritas: Catholicism and the Liberal Arts and Sciences,” which explored the relationship of faith and reason across disciplines.“When deciding on a theme, we consider the current contemporary religious and theological issues, or if there are any significant milestones within the Church,” Egan said. “The 500th anniversary of Teresa of Avila’s birth is one such milestone.”While other CFS lecture series have focused on larger concepts, such as “facets of justice” or “leadership of Catholic women both past and current,” Egan said the spring 2015 series will discuss rather particular aspects of Teresa’s life and work.The first lecture, titled “Teresa of Avila: Prayer is an Adventure in Love,” will take place Feb. 17 at 7:30 p.m.“Our first lecturer, Keith Egan, Aquinas chair of Catholic theology emeritus at Saint Mary’s, will explore Teresa’s thoughts on prayer and love because for this saint and doctor of the Church, she spent her life searching for God through prayer,” Egan said. “For her, prayer is an ‘exercise in love.’”On March 3 at 7:30 p.m., the second lecture, “Teresa the Theologian on the Human Person as Capax Dei” will feature a visiting scholar from Fairfield University.“Elizabeth Dreyer, religious studies professor at Fairfield University, will consider Teresa’s work as an incarnational theologian and how that has or hasn’t prospered in the history of Christian theology and spirituality,” Egan said.The third and final lecture of the series will feature a panel of both undergraduate and post-graduate students from Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame, titled “Teresa and Us: The Significance of Teresa of Avila for Young Catholic Women Today.” The panel will take place March 19 at 7:30 p.m.“Our final event in the series will be a panel discussion about the significance of Teresa for today’s young Catholic women,” Egan said. “Teresa was certainly a leader in the Church, she was a religious founder, a reformer, and her writings have been, and continue to be, very influential to theologians.”“How she is a source of wisdom is just as relevant today to young women as she was several hundred years ago,” she said.According to Egan, this series furthers the CFS’s purpose, as the organization was established in 1984 as a center to “build a theologically well-grounded spirituality among members of the College and greater South Bend community,” according to the press release.Egan said the events also support the religious and academic missions of the College.“World-renowned scholars come to Saint Mary’s to share their wisdom on contemporary religious issues and to address broader issues of how faith and reason interact,” Egan said.Senior Madison Maidment said she enjoys having the opportunity to hear such scholars discuss aspects of spirituality that are not often elaborated upon in religion courses as fully as possible.“I remember a lot of my friends who are nursing majors were really interested in the fall series because it had lectures concerning things like health care professions and biology,” Maidment said. “This spring series interests me a little more because it gives students a chance to get to know a saint on a more personal, relatable level, and I think that’s an awesome opportunity.“… But both series this school-year have brought topics to the table that aren’t often discussed in our daily lives, and I think these unique themes appeal to a wide variety of students.”Tags: Center for Spirituality, Center for Spirituality lecture series, CFS lecture series, Michelle Egan, Saint Teresa of Avila, Saint Teresa of Avila: Carmelite Mystic and Doctor of the Churchlast_img read more

Derek Jeter is the only sure thing on 2020 Baseball Hall of Fame ballot

first_imgFor those of us who are part of the electorate — this is my fourth vote — the confirmation emails went out Nov. 12. To be eligible to vote, BBWAA members have to be an active member for at least 10 consecutive years, with a 10-year grace period for writers no longer active. Previous voting members more than 10 years away from active status can apply for a vote based on their baseball coverage in the most recent season.MORE: Hall of Fame ceremony deserves stage by itselfHere’s part of that email. Based on your qualifications, you have been approved to vote in the 2020 Baseball Hall of Fame BBWAA election. Your 2020 ballot will be sent from Cooperstown on Monday, November 18 to the mailing address you provided through the voting registration process. You must complete, sign and return your ballot in the envelope provided. Your ballot must be postmarked no later than December 31 in order for your selections to be included in the 2020 results.You will have the opportunity to vote for zero to 10 candidates. Any candidate who receives votes on 75 percent or more of ballots cast will be inducted into the Hall of Fame on Sunday, July 26, 2020.It has always been, and always will be exciting to receive that email. So let’s take a look at the players on this year’s ballot, which was officially released at noon ET on Monday. We’ll start with the newcomers. Derek Jeter will be elected, without question, but he’s the only newbie likely to be a part of the class of 2020. After Jeter, guys like Bobby Abreu, Cliff Lee, Jason Giambi present interesting, but complicated cases. All are worth a few years of conversation, at least. From there, players who could receive a few votes but aren’t likely to meet the 5 percent minimum required to stay on the ballot: Alfonso Soriano, Paul Konerko, Josh Beckett, Brian Roberts and Eric Chávez. Also on this year’s ballot, outstanding players who don’t have a realistic shot at winding up in Cooperstown but deserve mention: Heath Bell, Adam Dunn, Chone Figgins, Rafael Furcal, Raúl Ibañez, Carlos Peña, Brad Penny, J.J. Putz and José Valverde.Here are the bios for all the new players  on the Baseball Hall of Fame website. The Post Office for the Village of Cooperstown is across the street from the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum — literally, maybe two dozen steps — and this particular Monday is a special day. The 2020 Hall of Fame ballots are being mailed from the 40 Main Street building today, sent out across the country to BBWAA writers who have the honor and responsibility of voting for the players who will make up the class of 2020.  And now, a quick look at the holdovers. Curt Schilling, Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens are all in their eighth year on the ballot — each player gets 10, remember — and each received between 59.1 and 60.9 percent of last year’s vote. All three have Cooperstown-worthy numbers, but all three have likely been held back because of the vague character clause on the ballot. This is Larry Walker’s 10th year on the ballot, and he’s made great strides, up to 54.6 percent of last year’s vote. With the ballot-clearing of recent years — 11 players elected the past three years — Walker stands a legitimate chance of being elected this winter. And here are the other returning players, with their 2019 percentage of the vote and how many times they’ve been on the ballot: Omar Vizquel (42.8 percent, third year on the ballot), Manny Ramirez (22.8, fourth), Jeff Kent (18.1, seventh), Scott Rolen (17.2, third), Billy Wagner (16.7, fifth), Todd Helton (16.5, second), Gary Sheffield (13.6, sixth), Andy Pettitte (9.9, second), Sammy Sosa (8.5, eighth), Andruw Jones (7.5, third).last_img read more