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Snite Museum exhibit focuses on African experience

first_imgThe Snite Museum of Art’s new fall exhibit stretches through numerous rooms with large paintings, sculptures and even electric metal signs. Biographies of the many artists adorn the walls alongside their respective artwork, giving more of a story to each piece. Each work of art tells some kind of rich and brilliant story, typically etched into the history of the black experience.This exhibit, entitled “Solidary and Solitary: the Joyner/Giuffrida Collection,” was brought to the Snite Museum by curators Christopher Bedford and Katy Siegel. It celebrates black artists and will be up for viewing in the museum until December 15.According to a press release from the Snite Museum, this is a historical exhibition that offers a new perspective on issues people of African descent have faced throughout history.“This will be the first large-scale public exhibition to bring together a vital lineage of visionary black artists,” the press release said. “This exhibition offers a new perspective on the critical contribution black artists have made to the evolution of visual art from the 1940s through the present day.”Gina Costa, marketing and public relations manager for the Snite Museum, said this exhibition has been on display around the country and the former director of the Snite, Charles Loving, worked with the Baltimore Museum of Art to get “Solidary and Solitary” to Notre Dame. However, because of space limitations, the Snite Museum can only show part of the exhibit.“It was a great opportunity for the museum to display an exhibition that offers a new perspective of the critical contribution of black artists,” Costa said. “These works reveal how African artists have used abstraction as a visual vocabulary to talk about the issue of being black, social struggles and the international African diaspora.”The exhibit displays works from a wide variety of artists using several different mediums. Some include oil canvas paintings, re-draped canvas, sculptures, found fabric and more.Costa said the most notable artists are Sam Gilliam, Norman Lewis and Kevin Beasley.Quoting the Snite press release, Costa said “the entire collection is really of an unparalleled level and shows the power of abstract art as a profound political choice rather than just a stylistic preference for generations of artists.”According to the press release, “[the exhibit] will reveal a rich and complex history woven from the threads of artistic debates about how to embody blackness, social struggle and change.”Museum visitors will have the opportunity to meet the curators, Bedford and Siegel, during a free public reception with refreshments on the evening of Oct. 26.Costa also said she wanted to emphasize the accessibility of the Snite Museum to Notre Dame students.“Students often don’t know that the museum is free and open to the public. It’s their museum.”Editor‘s note: A previous version of this story incorrectly stated the role of Christopher Bedford and Katy Siegel in the Snite Museum’s new exhibition. Bedford and Siegel are the curators of the exhibition. The Observer regrets this error.Tags: Snite Museum, Snite Museum of Art, Solidary and Solitarylast_img read more

The Rise and Fall of Anne Morrow Lindbergh

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.”Charles Dickens’ 1859 words still ring true. Many people believe they control their lives: With luck or power, they soar and grow in stature. Others navigate the tightrope of survival, fearing a fall from grace.Anne Morrow Lindbergh lived through the best of times, marrying wisely, raising five children, learning to fly, and becoming a best-selling author. Then, the times shifted, destiny intervened, and the sky fell.THE BEST OF TIMESBorn in 1906, Anne Morrow was raised in a New Jersey mansion, the daughter of a successful diplomat and a feminist pioneer. At age 18, she declared her wish: “To marry a hero.”And she did. In 1927, she met Charles Augustus Lindbergh Jr. The 25-year-old daredevil barnstorming pilot had made history at Roosevelt Field airfield (now the Source Mall), when his Spirit of St. Louis made the first nonstop solo transAtlantic flight. His  subsequent tour in his plane popularized flight and bolstered the Golden Age of Aviation.The first date for the “Lone Eagle” and the Smith College senior was in an airplane over LI. Their 1929 marriage catapulted Anne into celebrity. She became the first woman to earn a glider pilot’s license, then practiced for her pilot’s license in a “Bird” at the Hicksville Long Island Aviation Country Club, the haven for the society and aviation elite.She went “round and round the field alone…making one hideously bumpy landing after another.”Anne often flew from Uniondale’s Mitchel Field in a Weaver Aircraft Company biplane, as “Willie K” Vanderbilt’s Motor Parkway snaked past potato fields below.She was Charles’ co-pilot, navigator, and radio operator on global route surveys. When Charles set a transcontinental speed record, she was the seven-months-pregnant navigator.Internationally adored, the handsome adventurer and the shy, attractive author/pilot could do no wrong.THE WORST OF TIMESThe Lindberghs moved to a secluded New Jersey mansion in 1932 to avoid the press. Shortly after, their firstborn infant son was kidnapped. Ransom was paid, but after several months his dead body was found nearby. Newspapers dubbed it the “Crime of the Century.”It was later revealed that Charles had locked the 18-month-old baby outside, encouraging independence. He forbade Anne to cry after the kidnapping and murder. He was lonely and stoic, perhaps because his parents had separated when he was 7 years old.After the murder, the Lindberghs rejected the relentless media and fled to England. Anne’s first book was published in 1935, and a German carpenter was convicted of the murder and executed.In 1936, the U.S. government asked Charles to tour German aircraft factories. Impressed by Hitler’s airpower, Charles deemed a war unwinnable. As the leading spokesman for the isolationist anti-Semitic, America First movement, Charles wrote in Reader’s Digest that Western countries should band together to preserve their inheritance of European blood.Supporting Charles, in 1940 Anne published The Wave of the Future, advising America to reject foreign wars. Its defeatist tone was despised; she later labeled her work naive.Furious Americans, having endured the 1929 stock market crash and the Great Depression, rejected their Golden Pair as Nazi apologists. In early 1940, the Lindberghs moved to Lloyds Neck; by late 1940, Charles was labeled a traitor.In her diary, Anne wrote, “I am now the bubonic plague among writers and C. is the anti-Christ!” … “My marriage has stretched me out of my world, changed me so it is no longer possible to change back.”In the early 1950s, Anne sought psychotherapy; Charles, displeased, vacated their bedroom. She later had an affair with her therapist. In 1955, her feminist manifesto Gift of the Sea was published.CONTRADICTIONS AND COMPLIANCECharles died in 1974, Anne in 2001. Family skeletons surfaced: Charles had controlled his family with tedious checklists, lectures, and banned holiday celebrations. Anne kept quiet, valiantly keeping up with her husband’s travels.One diary entry read, “Damn, damn, damn! I am sick of being this ‘handmaiden to the Lord.’”In 2003, the news broke: From 1957 until his death, Charles had fathered seven children with three mistresses in Germany. Anne’s relatives said Anne had suspected something, but didn’t know what. Her stalwart silence preserved the myth till the end — because they had, after all, the best of times.last_img read more