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Do This: Long Island Concert & Events April 7–13

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The True CostThis groundbreaking documentary about clothes, those who make them and the industry’s worldwide impact asks viewers to consider who really pays the price for our clothing. Screening followed by panel discussion. Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave., Huntington. cinemaartscentre.org $10 members, $15 public. 7 p.m. April 7.John WaiteThe British rocker best known for his 1984 hit “Missing You” takes his Wooden Heart Accoustic Tour on the road with an intimate evening of songs, stories and Q&As, featuring The Axemen, Tim Hogan and Mark Ricciardi. YMCA Boulton Center for the Performing Arts, 37 West Main St., Bay Shore. boultoncenter.org $40-$70. 8 p.m. April 7.Duke RobillardThe legendary blues guitarist, singer, bandleader, songwriter and producer brings his special groove to Long Island in support of his current CD, “The Acoustic Blues & Roots of Duke Robillard,” released last September. Treme Blues and Jazz Club, 553 Main St., Islip. tremeislip.com $10. 8:30 p.m. April 8.Legends of Old SchoolA trip down hip hop memory lane with Slick Rick, Big Daddy Kane and Rakim. The Emporium, 1 Railroad Ave., Patchogue. theemporiumny.com $20, $30 DOS. 9 p.m. April 8.Citizen CopeAn intimate solo acoustic performance featuring the soulful, genre-defying sounds of Citizen Cope, aka Clarence Greenwood. This singer/songwriter/music producer whose songs have been recorded by Carlos Santana, Dido, Pharoahe Monch and the late Richie Havens will be performing his own compositions. Opening the show will be Victoria Reed. The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington. paramountny.com $25-$66. 9 p.m. April 8.Taste of Flight Wine and Food FestWine, artisanal food trucks, Long Island’s top chefs and local dessert masters, all under one roof! Can you handle it? Come hungry and thirsty–and you’ll leave fulfilled. Cradle of Aviation Museum, Charles Lindbergh Blvd., Garden City. cradleofaviation.org $25-$50. 6 p.m. April 9.Mock The VoteWashington D.C.-based satirists The Capitol Steps lampoon Obama, Hillary Clinton, the GOP presidential hopefuls and more. As people say, after you see The Capitol Steps, you’ll realize that the opposite of progress…is Congress. Imagine the First Amendment set to four-part harmony and you’ll get a sense of their take on the issues of our day. You’ll laugh at their clever parodies and their music is right on the mark, too. Not to be missed.  patchoguetheatre.org $27. 8 p.m. April 9.PusciferWhen the enigmatic Maynard James Keenan isn’t the frontman for prog-rock bands Tool and A Perfect Circle, fans can find him performing for his solo act, touring to promote the third album, Money Shot, released in October. Opening the show is Luchafer. The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington. paramountny.com $35-$75. 8 p.m. April 9.Walshy FireMember of the LA-based electronic group Major Lazer, Walshy Fire will get the dance party started. The Emporium, 1 Railroad Ave., Patchogue. theemporiumny.com Free. 10 p.m. April 9.It’s More Expensive to Do NothingThis documentary exposes the side of criminal justice left out of popular TV shows such as Cops and Law & Order: revolving door prison institutionalization, the complexities of remediation and programs that have worked to help nonviolent ex-offenders succeed after release. Panel discussion to follow screening. Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave., Huntington. cinemaartscentre.org $10 members, $15 public. 10 a.m. April 10.JourneysAn opening reception will be held for Huntington artist Constance Wain’s solo exhibit, which includes collages and art created in mixed media. b.j. spoke gallery, 299 Main St., Huntington. bjspokegallery.com Free. 2 p.m. April 10.Internal BleedingThis local death metal quintet are the self-described pioneers of slam, a heavy, groove-laden style of death-core. Warming up the crowd are Thracian, In Lucid Dreams, Path We Choose and Aegresco. Revolution Bar and Music Hall, 140 Merrick Rd., Amityville. revolutionli.com $12, $15 DOS. 6:30 p.m. April 10.Esperanza SpaldingThis stunningly talented Grammy-winning singer-composer-bassist performs her newest project, “Emily’s D+Evolution,” which she describes as “live musical vignettes.” She’s a true artist and we’re lucky to have her. Tilles Center for the Performing Arts, LIU Post, 720 Northern Blvd., Brookville. tillescenter.org $31-$86. 7 p.m. April 10.Eric PaslayAt 15, Eric Paslay wrote his first song. The rest, as they say, is history. Whether he’s penning number-one hits for Rascal Flatts and Lady Antebellum, or captivating listeners with his own tunes, Eric Paslay is rocking the country music world with his soul-searching lyrics and on-stage charm. No longer the guy behind the scenes, Paslay has taken center stage with last year’s eponymous record. With so much radio airplay, “Friday Night” is sure to be a singalong and “Song About a Girl” will have everyone on  their feet. Mulcahy’s Pub and Concert Hall, 3232 Railroad Ave., Wantagh. muls.com $20-$25. 7 p.m. April 10.Take 6 and Manhattan TransferThese two a-cappella groups will show how varied the genre can be. Alabama-based Take 6 performs gospel while New York City-based Manhattan Transfer sings jazz fusion and pop. NYCB Theatre at Westbury, 960 Brush Hollow Rd., Westbury. venue.thetheatreatwestbury.com 7 p.m. April 10.Brenda JanowitzThis highly regarded local author will be speaking and signing copies of her fifth novel, The Dinner Party, a delicious new work of scintillating fiction. Janowitz, a graduate of Cornell and Hofstra Law School, has been published in The New York Times, the Washington Post and Salon, to name a few venues. If you’re nice, maybe she’ll tell you what’s cooking in her popular book, “Recipes for a Happy Life.” Book Revue, 313 New York Ave., Huntington. bookrevue.com Price of book. 7 p.m. April 12.Belinda CarlisleThis LA-based darling diva, best known as the former frontwoman of The Go-Go’s, is touring in advance of the release of her first new solo album in nearly a decade. She’ll surely sing some Go-Go’s hits, such as “Mad About You”, “I Get Weak” and “Heaven Is a Place on Earth.” Hey, one thing’s for sure, Belinda’s Go-Go never got up and went. She’s still got it going on, if you can keep up with her, that is. The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington. paramountny.com $25-$75. 8 p.m. April 12.Just Eat ItThis documentary follows food lovers Jen and Grant, who expose the billions of dollars of food wasted on the trip from farm to fork. A meaty issue, indeed, and timely too, considering the hundreds of thousands of people going hungry every day on Long Island. A panel discussion follows the screening. Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave., Huntington. cinemaartscentre.org $10 members, $15 public. 7:30 p.m. April 13.Ace FrehleyHere’s an interesting tidbit for fans of Ace Frehley, the Kiss guitarist: on his newest album, Space Invaders, his fiance, Rachael Gordon, wrote the lyrics to two songs, “Change” and “Immortal Pleasures.” When this Rock and Roll Hall of Famer storms into town to promote the album, he’s sure to bust out both songs. Prepare to “rock and roll all night” as one of the most influential rock guitarists of all time brings his brand of far-out music to our little corner of the planet. The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington. paramountny.com $27.50-$69.50. 8 p.m. April 13.last_img read more

Tennis News Roger Federer suffers shock defeat in ATP Finals, in danger of not qualifying for semi-final

first_imgNew Delhi: Roger Federer suffered a shock straight-sets defeat to Kei Nishikori at the ATP Finals, severely denting his bid for the 100th title of his illustrious career.   The Swiss, who has won the season-ending event a record six times, produced an uncharacteristically error-prone and fractious display in the round-robin match on Sunday as the Japanese seventh seed prevailed 7-6 (7/4) 6-3.  The result means Federer is now in danger of failing to qualify for the semi-finals for just the second time in 16 appearances at the event. Read More |  Messi scores brace, Barcelona suffer first home loss in two years”I felt we both struggled, you know, throughout the first set,” he said. “You could tell it was sort of a first round. I had my chances maybe a bit more than he did.Then I started to feel better in the second set. I think we both did. The level went up. Unfortunately I couldn’t keep the lead that I got early. That was important, I think, at the end. That was the key of the match.”   Read More | Manchester City beat Manchester United, Liverpool continue winning runFederer, 37, has beaten Nishikori in Shanghai and Paris in recent weeks but despite having the backing of a full house at the O2 Arena, he never really settled into a groove.  The normally cool Swiss was warned by the umpire for ball abuse in the 12th game after Nishikori produced a staggering backhand winner down the line.  The Swiss great made 20 unforced errors in the first set and Nishikori capitalised, forcing a tie-break in which he raced to a 6/1 lead before sealing it 7/4.  Federer, showing real urgency, broke Nishikori immediately at the start of the second set but it proved a false dawn as he lost his own serve immediately Nishikori broke again in the sixth game and kept his nerve, serving out for victory.  Read More | Lewis Hamilton wins Brazilian GP, Max Verstappen involved in punch-up”I lost to him twice in the last two months so I played more aggressively and things started working, especially in the second set. There were some lucky points but I played well today,” said Nishikori.  Overall the statistics made grim reading for Federer, who made a total of 34 unforced errors against 19 winners.  Federer denied that cutting back on his schedule increased the pressure on him to do well at the tournaments he did play.  “I don’t think, per se, I’m playing worse because of it,” he said. “I think I’ve had that pressure, not going out early, most of my career.”   Anderson win The ATP Finals is contested by the eight players who have accumulated the most ranking points over the season separated into two groups, with the best four players reaching the knockout semi-finals stage.  Earlier, Kevin Anderson made an impressive ATP Finals debut in the same Lleyton Hewitt group, beating Dominic Thiem 6-3 7-6 (12/10).  The Wimbledon finalist, who stands at 2.03 metres (six feet eight inches) tall dominated the early exchanges and secured the crucial break in the fourth game.  Thiem tightened up his game in the second set and forced a tie-break, but Anderson saved two set points and converted his fourth match point.  “I definitely felt a little bit nervous,” said Anderson. “But I was able to settle very quickly and find a really good rhythm, taking care of my serve games nicely, created quite a few opportunities on his serve.”  For all the Latest Sports News News, Tennis News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more

Pentagon: US Strikes Iran-Backed Group That Hit Iraq Base

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. launched airstrikes Thursday in Iraq, targeting the Iranian-backed Shia militia members believed responsible for the rocket attack that killed and wounded American and British troops at a base north of Baghdad, the Pentagon said.U.S. officials said multiple strikes by U.S. fighter jets hit five locations and mainly targeted Kataib Hezbollah weapons facilities inside Iraq. A Defense Department statement said the strikes targeted five weapons storage facilities “to significantly degrade their ability to conduct future attacks.”The strikes marked a rapid escalation in tensions with Tehran and its proxy groups in Iraq, just two months after Iran carried out a massive ballistic missile attack against American troops at a base in Iraq. They came just hours after top U.S. defense leaders threatened retaliation for the Wednesday rocket attack, making clear that they knew who did it and that the attackers would be held accountable.“The United States will not tolerate attacks against our people, our interests, or our allies,” Defense Secretary Mark Esper said. “As we have demonstrated in recent months, we will take any action necessary to protect our forces in Iraq and the region.”The Pentagon statement said the facilities hit in the precision strikes were used to store weapons used to target the U.S. and coalition forces. It called the counterattack “defensive, proportional and in direct response to the threat” posed by the Iranian-backed Shia militia groups.U.S. officials said the locations of the strikes were largely around the Baghdad region. One U.S. official said there were two strikes at Jurf al-Sakher, one in Karbala, one at Al-Musayib, and one at Arab Nawar Ahmad. The official said the U.S. expected casualties would be lower than 50, and said the main effort was to hit the weapons.The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because some details about the operations had not yet been made public.An official with the paramilitary Popular Mobilization Units told The Associated Press that two Iraqi federal police personnel were killed in Jurf al-Sakher. An Iraqi military statement said the aerial “aggression” occurred at 1:15 a.m. in the areas of Jurf al-Sakher, Al-Musayib, Najaf and Alexandria on the headquarters of the Popular Mobilization Units, emergency regiments and commandos of the 9th division of the Iraqi army.Esper told reporters at the Pentagon earlier Thursday that President Donald Trump had given him the authority to take whatever action he deemed necessary.“We’re going to take this one step at a time, but we’ve got to hold the perpetrators accountable,” Esper said. “You don’t get to shoot at our bases and kill and wound Americans and get away with it.”At the White House, Trump had also hinted that a U.S. counterpunch could be coming, telling reporters, “We’ll see what the response is.” And Army Gen. Mark Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told Pentagon reporters the U.S. knows ”with a high degree of certainty” who launched the attack.On Capitol Hill earlier in the day, Marine Gen. Frank McKenzie, the top U.S. commander for the Middle East, told senators the deaths of U.S. and coalition troops created a “red line” for the U.S., but said he didn’t think Iran has “a good understanding of where our red line is.”Asked if any counterattack could include a strike inside Iran, Esper said, “We are focused on the group that we believe perpetrated this in Iraq.”Two U.S. troops and one British service member were killed and 14 other personnel were wounded when 18 rockets hit the base Wednesday. The U.S. military said the 107 mm Katyusha rockets were fired from a truck launcher that was found by Iraqi security forces near the base after the attack.U.S. officials have not publicly said what group they believe launched the rocket attack, but Kataib Hezbollah, an Iranian-backed Shia militia group, was the likely perpetrator. And the U.S. strikes, which came in the middle of the night in Iraq, targeted that group.Kataib Hezbollah was responsible for a late December rocket attack on a military base in Kirkuk that killed a U.S. contractor, prompting American military strikes in response.That in turn led to protests at the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad. They were followed Jan. 3 by a U.S. airstrike that killed Iran’s most powerful military officer, Gen. Qassem Soleimani, and Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, a leader of the Iran-backed militias in Iraq, of which Kataib Hezbollah is a member. In response to the Soleimani killing, Iran launched a massive ballistic missile attack on Jan. 8, at al-Asad air base in Iraq, that resulted in traumatic brain injuries to more than 100 American troops.McKenzie told the Senate Armed Services Committee on Thursday morning that the killing of Soleimani and the increase in U.S. troops and assets in the region has made clear to Iran that the U.S. will defend its interests there. He said the U.S. has re-established a level of deterrence for state-on-state attacks by Iran.However, he said: “What has not been changed is their continuing desire to operate through their proxies indirectly again us. That is a far more difficult area to deter.”On Thursday, Esper and Milley said they spoke with their British counterparts about the attack, but declined to provide details.Asked why none of the rockets was intercepted, Milley said there are no systems on the base capable of defending against that type of attack.He also said the 14 injured personnel were a mix of U.S. and allied troops as well as contractors, and they will also be monitored for possible traumatic brain injury in the wake of the blasts.last_img read more