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Saina Nehwal enters second round; HS Prannoy ousted in Barcelona

first_imgBarcelona: Veteran shuttler Saina Nehwal advanced to the women’s singles second round of the USD 170,000 Barcelona Spain Masters as Pranaav Jerry Chopra and Sikki N Reddy also recorded victories in their mixed doubles first round match here on Wednesday. Saina beat Germany’s Yvonne Li 21-16, 21-14 while Pranaav and Reddy prevailed over Denmark’s Mathias Christiansen and Alexandra Boje 10-21, 21-16, 21-17.But HS Prannoy suffered a defeat at the hands of Malaysian Daren Liew 18-21, 15-21 to bow out of the meet.Saina is keen to keep her Olympic hopes alive after enduring a rough 2019 and a bad start to this year.Also Read: Saina Nehwal is in kind of a tight situation: Parupalli Kashyap on Olympics qualificationAlso Watch: Oil India Ltd (OIL) confers Shikshya Ratna Puraskar 2019 to Teachers in Duliajanlast_img read more

Syracuse sees success using consistent pitcher-catcher combinations

first_imgPitching against Northwestern on Feb. 20, Jocelyn Cater struggled to control her pitches. She allowed four walks in as many innings to start the game.To calm her down, catcher Julie Wambold called time and came to the mound.“She’ll come out and say, ‘Hey we’re nervous, take a breath, let’s get past this and get the next one,’” Cater said.Cater retired six straight batters from the end of the fourth to the start of the sixth.While Syracuse (7-8) employs two different catchers, its pitchers tend to throw to the same catcher due to defensive requirements. Sydney O’Hara plays first base when she isn’t pitching, causing a ripple effect that sends Wambold to catch for Cater. When O’Hara does pitch, Wambold is at second to complete the infield, sending Alyssa Dewes behind the plate.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThough head coach Leigh Ross said these changes are merely a product of O’Hara playing first when she doesn’t pitch, the result has paired O’Hara with Dewes in six of her seven starts and Cater with Wambold in six of her eight.“Once you start working with a catcher, you get really comfortable with them,” O’Hara said.O’Hara said she is comfortable with both catchers but she seems happy to be working more with the same one. She and Dewes have been working on staying low, blocking the ball and keeping loose balls in front of Dewes when runners are on base.When she throws with pitching coach Mike Bosch watching, she tends to throw to Dewes.“We’re definitely more comfortable with each other,” Dewes said. “I know what she likes to throw in certain situations, but I feel comfortable catching for both pitchers.”Cater said that the two-catcher rotation is a strength of the team. Cater is left-handed, which Ross said causes the ball to spin differently, and throws a fast rise ball.  Both catchers have caught her enough in practice to be comfortable with her.Against Northwestern, Cater said that Wambold is better at reading her and calming her down during games.“I love Julie behind the plate, I really do,” Ross said. “I think she brings a sense of calmness to the team.”Though the pitcher-catcher combinations have so far been a product of the infield’s defensive needs, Ross said that might change when pitcher AnnaMarie Gatti returns from injury.While O’Hara and Cater are rise ball pitchers, Gatti throws a heavy drop ball that cuts down late. Ross said that Wambold is better at framing drop balls as strikes and that she would probably catch for Gatti. The rest of the infield would remain intact with Wambold catching Gatti.In the batter’s box, Wambold and Dewes have been polar opposites this season. Wambold is second on the team in RBI while Dewes is second to last among everyday players in batting average.Wambold’s hitting commands playing time, but Ross said she wouldn’t change the catcher rotation despite Dewes’ struggles, proving the importance of the growing comfort between pitcher and catcher.Said Ross: “Sometimes there is that correlation where a pitcher gets really comfortable with a certain catcher and they bring the best out of that pitcher.” Comments Published on March 3, 2015 at 12:07 am Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

PROTÉGÉ

first_img Published on August 31, 2016 at 8:04 pm Contact Jon: jrmettus@syr.edu | @jmettus “He’s basically my little brother,” Sanu said. “I’ve always looked out for him. … To see him where he’s at today, I’m not surprised.”The pair first met when Strickland was about 7 or 8 years old and playing Pop Warner football. Sanu was a high school star who had just moved to the area, helping out with the practices and talking with the kids.Strickland was already hooked on football, but meeting Sanu was the “cherry on top.” Sanu noticed a talent in Strickland that stood out from the rest so he took him under his wing.,The next two years were spent with Strickland going to all of Sanu’s high school games, hearing Sanu’s name on the loudspeaker and imagining himself in the same spot.And as the duo got older, the closer they became.“Not the family everybody throws around, but truly family,” George said to describe their relationship. “And I mean took care of him.”Sanu would constantly pick Strickland up to workout and run routes. The NFL wide receiver still jokes with the college running back about switching positions.When Sanu was at Rutgers, he’d bring Strickland back to school with him to work out. Once Sanu reached the NFL, he hired a personal trainer. Then, he brought Jabbie and Strickland to the sessions with him. The trainer understood the situation. They were able to keep up.“I just always made sure I kept them around me so they weren’t around the wrong people,” Sanu said. “You have to have good influences around you so you don’t fall into the wrong crowd.,“I never wanted anything to happen to them as far as being at the wrong place at the wrong time.”Even when Sanu bought his first car after making it to the NFL — a Porsche Cayenne — he brought Strickland along.And when Strickland waited two or three days to go see Sanu the last time he was home, Sanu got upset, Strickland’s father, Bill, said.Before games, Sanu will tell Strickland: “Yo, Tae Beamer. Go hard.” Strickland called Sanu before a preseason game against the Cleveland Browns to say, “Yo, Mo. Go ball out. Time to ball out.”Strickland often reaches out to Sanu for advice. Sanu usually preaches extra work, humbleness and other requirements he has realized to make it to the NFL.,“I’ve been through what he’s going through now,” Sanu said. “… I know what it’s like so I’ve just been trying to help him get accustomed to what should he expect.”Strickland has come a long way from the slacking high school sophomore in need of a lecture, and his guiding influence has always been Sanu. Whether it be about college life or football or personal issues, Sanu is his go-to for advice.“It’s amazing just to have him by your side,” Strickland said, “always asking questions (such as) if you need any help about football or life skills. Anything.”“Just an awesome feeling seeing them grow up,” Sanu said. “I was there to help them through it.” Comments When Dontae Strickland’s grades were slipping, putting his future scholarship offers and football career in jeopardy, his football coach at South Brunswick High School knew just one man who could break through.Joe George, the coach, called up then-Cincinnati Bengals wide receiver Mohamed Sanu to visit during his bye week for a surprise meeting in the coach’s office with Strickland and Sanu’s nephew, Mohamed Jabbie, who had grade problems as well.Sanu wasn’t just serving as a professional football player to command respect from an aspiring professional athlete, or even just a former South Brunswick (New Jersey) football star to give advice to someone whose shoes he had been in several years earlier.He was, and is, practically family to Strickland. So he didn’t hold anything back.What followed was “a lot of yelling, screaming,” Strickland said. George couldn’t help but think he probably shouldn’t be in the room as Sanu got “down and dirty with them.” The 45-minute to an hour-long speech left them all in tears, Sanu said.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe message was clear: You only play football once in your life. Don’t throw it away. No one cares how good you are if you don’t have the grades to go to college.“It was probably one of the best speeches that anyone has ever given me,” Strickland said, “and motivated me, probably still to this day, to give it my all no matter how bad I’m feeling or what’s going on.”Throughout Strickland’s football career and life, Sanu has served as a role model, mentor and source of tough love. He gave Strickland the nickname Tae Beamer because Strickland moves like a BMW, a nickname that’s stuck to this day.Strickland is entering his sophomore year and, despite seeing limited action as a hybrid in 2015, rose to the No. 1 running back spot in the spring. He was hurt for the latter part of training camp but still held the top running back spot on the Week 1 depth chart released Monday. Strickland said Tuesday he is “100 percent.” This is placeholder text Advertisement Facebook Twitter Google+ Dontae Strickland has developed a brotherly bond with NFL WR Mohamed Sanu Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.last_img read more

Danilo completes Man City move

first_img0Shares0000Danilo joined Real Madrid from Porto in 2015, but started just 17 league games for the European champions last season © AFP/FileLONDON, United Kingdom, Jul 23 – Real Madrid right-back Danilo completed his move to Manchester City on Sunday, the Brazilian joining Pep Guardiola’s Premier League giants on a five-year contract.The 26-year-old will now link up with City on their pre-season tour of the United States after agreeing personal terms and passing his medical. “There has been strong interest from other clubs, but it has always been my ambition to play for Pep Guardiola,” Danilo told his new club’s official website.“As soon as I heard of his interest, I knew immediately I wanted to be a City player,” he added.His departure from the European champions had been confirmed by Real boss Zinedine Zidane on Saturday on the eve of his team’s meeting with Manchester United in California.According to the BBC he moves to Manchester on a £26.5 million (29.5 million euros) deal.Guardiola had made full-backs his top transfer priority in the close season having released Pablo Zabaleta, Gael Clichy and Bacary Sagna.Danilo links up with City’s new recruit Kyle Walker, the Tottenham defender who signed a five-year contract for a fee that could rise with add-ons to £54 million (61m euros) this month.Danilo, who joined European champions Real in 2015 from Porto, started just 17 Spanish league games last season with Dani Carvajal often preferred in the right-back role.The Spanish international started ahead of Danilo in the Champions League final in Cardiff as Real Madrid beat Juventus 4-1 to lift their 12th European Cup.Real are due to face City in Los Angeles next week.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more