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Matt Saal, April 27

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest We are still pretty cold. We have been getting light showers the past week but we are not that wet. Guys have been out in the fields getting stuff done. There has not been any planting here around me, but I definitely think there will be some corn going in the ground this week. We have a 40% chance for rain today and it is actually sprinkling right now as well. And then there is a 40% chance of rain on Thursday and Friday too I think. I think we might start trying to plant at the end of the week and for sure next week if the weather cooperates. I have seen forecasts with temperatures in the 60s this week.The hay is coming on. It is just going to be a little delayed. I still think it is still two weeks behind. The pastures are better — a little less muddy.The weeds are starting to come on now. The purple deadnettle is starting to really green up the fields. It is not bad yet and sprayers are rolling now. Guys are starting to get after it. There have been some field cultivators and chisel plows rolling too.Things are pretty normal as far as the progression of spring goes, just a little later than normal. We are still well ahead of last year. We planted our first field of corn on May 23 last year and that was only 20 acres. I think we finished up on July 3, but everything actually did really well. So we are still on the very front end of opportunity around here.last_img read more

More Green From Beans – 3

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Darcy MaulsbyProgressive Farmer Contributing EditorAs he looks across his fields spanning the flat terrain of northern Iowa, Mike Riggert isn’t just seeing rows of soybeans. He’s thinking about ways to adjust his seeding rates.“For years, we planted a flat rate of 150,000 seeds per acre, but we’ve definitely cut back on seeding rates in the last two or three years,” said Riggert, who farms with his brother, Brian, near Whittemore.It’s a targeted process for Riggert, who plants soybeans in 30-inch rows and has been experimenting with variable-rate seeding. In some cases, he has dropped rates as low as 80,000 or 90,000 seeds per acre. In other places, like high-pH areas that tend to stunt the plants, Riggert has planted 175,000 seeds per acre. In fields with neutral soil pH and adequate fertility, he typically plants 120,000 seeds per acre.“You can get good yields with lower planting populations if you pay attention to detail,” said Dan Bjorklund, seed team leader for MaxYield Cooperative, which serves the Riggert farm. “Mike planted slow enough to singulate, and he’s counting 80 to 100 pods per plant where the seeding rate is 120,000.”Riggert saw no yield loss with his lower planting rates in 2018. “Those areas didn’t yield more than expected, but they yielded the same as when we used higher seeding rates in years past. We came out ahead, because we didn’t plant more seeds than necessary.”Soybean farmers are finding ways to boost revenues despite market and trade challenges. This story is the third in a six-part series, More Green From Beans. The series looks at ways soybean farmers are finding ways to answer trade challenges by boosting revenues through switching up agronomics and finding new markets.SURVEY STUDIED OPTIMAL DENSITYDeciding the right seeding rate is one of the most influential factors for increasing soybean profitability since seed cost is one of the most expensive inputs.“I’ve been in this business 20 years, and farmers have talked about soybean seeding rates every year,” stated Seth Naeve, a University of Minnesota Extension soybean agronomist. “The thing to remember is that different fields respond differently to various planting populations.”Soil type, soil fertility and weather conditions affect final stand establishment. “We don’t look at variable-rate seeding as a way to get more soybean bushels,” Naeve added. “It’s really a way to save on seed costs.”Ignacio Ciampitti, an associate professor of crop production and cropping systems at Kansas State University, teamed up with Corteva Agriscience to study optimal plant density by yield environment.Researchers created a soybean database of seeding rates ranging from 69,000 to 271,000 seeds per acre, including final number of plants and seed yield. The results were classified by low-yield environments (less than 59.6 bushels per acre (bpa), medium-yield environments (59.6 to 64.1 bpa) and high-yield environments (more than 64.1 bpa). They found that:— Optimal plant density decreased by 24% from low (127,000 plants per acre) to high (97,000 plants per acre) yield environments.— The optimal density ranged between 109,000 to 144,000 plants per acre for the low-yield environments; from 77,000 to 114,000 plants per acre for the medium-yield environments; and 76,000 to 117,000 plants per acre for the high-yield environments.“It’s a myth that one of the best ways to increase soybean yield is just to plant more seeds,” Ciampitti said. “It depends. In a high-yield environment, you might be planting too high of a seeding rate. In a low-yielding environment, you might need to increase your soybean seeding rate.”NO YIELD DRAGJoe and Suzanne Shirbroun have found this to be true on their northeast Iowa farm. They began experimenting with various soybean seeding rates in 2015 through the Iowa Soybean Association’s On-Farm Network, which offers research opportunities focused on agronomics, cropping systems and more.“Standability issues pushed us,” said Joe Shirbroun, whose fields near Farmersburg are defined by rolling hills. “We were growing high-yield beans, but they were falling down.”The Shirbrouns, who plant in 15-inch rows, had been seeding a flat rate across all their soybean acres to get about 150,000 plants per acre. “We didn’t realize that having planting prescriptions would pay for soybeans like they do for corn,” said Amos Troester, the Shirbrouns’ Pioneer seed associate.The Shirbrouns began experimenting with lower plant populations in higher-yielding environments. “We can get down to 90,000 plants per acre in the low-lying areas, while our highest seeding rate is about 160,000 in other areas,” Suzanne Shirbroun said. “We didn’t see any yield drag with the lower seeding rates. Our yields were maintained, or they went up.”KEEP IT SIMPLEHow does geography affect soybean seeding rates? A series of studies financed by the United Soybean Board was conducted in 2012 and 2013 across the Midwest and Mid-South to examine high-input soybean production practices. Results showed that maximum yields were obtained between 100,000 and 165,000 seeds per acre across all nine states.In the southern states (Arkansas, Kansas and Kentucky), seeding rates between 130,000 to 170,000 seeds per acre were needed to obtain maximum yields. This response was consistent across production systems, regardless of whether they included a large number of yield-enhancing treatments like seed treatments, fungicides, growth promoters, etc.“You might assume you’d need much lower seeding rates in the South and higher seeding rates in the North, but that wasn’t always true,” Naeve said.Don’t get too concerned about specific prescriptions, however, he adds. Keep things simple, agrees Shawn Conley, a soybean and small grains specialist at the University of Wisconsin. “It’s not worth your time and money to hire someone to write a planting prescription. Buy a bag of seed per acre. Each bag contains about 140,000 seeds. Plant 120,000 seeds in higher-producing areas and 150,000 seeds in lower-producing areas.”Also, stay focused on Agronomy 101 basics. “Soybeans require management, just like corn,” Bjorklund said.Maintain a good soil-fertility program focused on potassium — a vital nutrient for soybeans, Conley said. Plant seeds 1 to 1.25 inches deep, ensuring good seed-to-soil contact. Also, plant as early as possible, as long as soil conditions are fit. “You get one chance to do it right,” said Bjorklund, who noted that mudding in beans can cause compaction, which can hinder seedlings from emerging evenly.Riggert began planting his 2019 beans on April 25. “This was much earlier than ever before,” he added. “The earlier-planted beans at lower populations have been superior, though, when you start counting nodes and pods.”Seed treatment is another key to success, especially with early-planted soybeans, Riggert said. It helps protect seedlings from diseases lurking in cold, wet soil, including sudden death syndrome. “When you start dropping your seeding rate, you need a strong seed treatment program,” Bjorklund said.Control weeds by using pre-emerge programs, multiple modes of action and a residual program to manage yield robbers such as waterhemp, Conley said. “While farmers get bored with the basics and want to talk about applying nitrogen or using molasses to boost soybean yields, the basics still matter the most,” Conley said.As for seeding rates, start small if you want to try cutting back. “Take baby steps,” Joe Shirbroun advised. “Take 20 acres of your farm, and learn from that.”(ES/AG)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Surging Bombers eye return to Final Four

first_imgJose Rizal U shoots for a Final Four berth when it battles resurgent Mapua, while Arellano fights for survival against San Sebastian in NCAA Season 93 basketball on Tuesday at Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan.A victory by the Heavy Bombers in the 2 p.m. clash with the Cardinals will book a return trip to the Final Four for coach Vergel Meneses’ charges, who last made the postseason two years ago.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa View comments The Chiefs, at 6-9, are teetering on the brink of elimination but a win could muddle up the race for the remaining Final Four berth. —CEDELF P. TUPAS Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF presidentcenter_img Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City MOST READ Although they are already out of the running for a Final Four spot, the Cardinals remain dangerous after last week’s back-to-back wins—their first this season.“What’s important is that we have our fate in our hands,” said JRU coach Vergel Meneses in Filipino. “We want to continue improving this late in the season and this game (against Mapua) gives us another chance to do that.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThe Bombers are also looking to continue their three-game win run and avoid a playoff for the last postseason spot. JRU is coming off a 60-58 victory over San Sebastian on Friday.Arellano, on the other hand, hopes to fan its Final Four hopes against San Sebastian in the 4 p.m. clash. Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles02:11’Not just basketball’: Circumcisions, pageants at Philippine courts00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Stags brace for tough stretch, seek to end Final Four drought LATEST STORIES Read Nextlast_img read more

Indian wrestling lost a mentor in Dara Singh, says IOA chief

first_imgThe Indian Olympic Association (IOA) has mourned the death of wrestler-turned-actor Dara Singh, and said Indian wrestling has lost a guide and mentor.IOA acting president Vijay Kumar Malhotra, in a condolence message, said Dara Singh raised wrestling’s profile with his impeccable demeanour, both on and off the arena, and added glamour quotient to it.”Indian wrestling in ’50s and ’60s was synonymous with Dara Singh and he gave a new dimension and direction to the sport which then it was confined only to rural India,” said Malhotra.He said Dara Singh’s rise to the fame also attracted rural youths to the sport and gave them a sense of self-belief.Dara Singh, 83, died at his residence in Mumbai early Thursday morning after a brief illness.last_img read more

BSF sounds alert in Tripura to check influx of Rohingyas

first_imgAgartala, Oct 18 (PTI) The Border Security Force (BSF) has sounded an alert along the 856-km-long Indo-Bangla international border in Tripura to check the influx of Rohingyas into the country.”The threat of Rohingya intrusion cannot be ruled out as in the past similar cross-border movement of the same group was observed. Many Rohingyas have taken shelter in Bangladesh. So, we have alerted our people guarding the border in Tripura to prevent any such intrusion,” BSF IG (Tripura Frontier), S R Ojha told reporters last evening.After the recent conflict in Rakhine province of Myanmar, not a single Rohingya has entered Tripura, the IG said.He informed the media that Tripura Frontier of BSF would organise a run on October 22 in memory of the BSF jawans who laid down their lives while guarding the border.”Anybody can participate in the run named BSF half Marathon. Eminent persons and sports personalities of Tripura will participate in the event,” Ojha said. PTI JOY RG SRYlast_img read more

14 days agoWest Brom ponder futures of loanees Willock, Diangana

first_imgWest Brom ponder futures of loanees Willock, Dianganaby Paul Vegas14 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveWest Brom are keen on retaining the services of Chris Willock.The former Arsenal youngster, who Albion picked up on a season-long loan from Benfica’s B-team, is yet to feature in Slaven Bilic’s first-team but he has been scoring goals in the U23s side with regularity, says Birmingham Live.Another loanee in Grady Diangana has been performing at a particularly high level in recent weeks. They’re performances that have led to suggestions that parent club West Ham United may consider their options in the January transfer window.As is customary between sides in England, the Premier League Irons have the right to recall Diangana in January, understood to be at any time over a two-week period in January.Albion lost Harvey Barnes back to Leicester City in similar circumstances last season. TagsTransfersLoan MarketAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

TV search and recommendations specialist ThinkAna

first_imgTV search and recommendations specialist, ThinkAnalytics, now serves more than 20 million over-the-top subscribers, after doubling its global subscriber base in the past year.Announcing the milestone figure, ThinkAnalytics said that its rapid growth in the OTT market follows contract wins with a “substantial number of OTT providers.” Its customers in this space include Viaplay, Fox and Sony Pictures Entertainment-owned VoD service Crackle.“This upswing in interest demonstrates that OTT providers are getting more savvy about the ways they can attract and retain customers. They are choosing to invest in ThinkAnalytics because we can meet their need for fast and effective deployments across multiple platforms, from set-top boxes to games consoles, at a cost-effective price point,” said ThinkAnalytics founder and chief technology officer, Peter Docherty.ThinkAnalytics now provides support for 27 languages and, after 10 years of investment, claims to have one of the largest teams of algorithm specialists, and analytics and information scientists, aimed at the media content search and recommendations market.last_img read more

MEMBERS can bring a friend to Langtree Park for ju

first_imgMEMBERS can bring a friend to Langtree Park for just a fiver!Loyal Members are being offered the chance to bring a friend to the Saints vs. Hull KR First Utility Super League fixture on Friday June 17 for a great discounted rate.Saints will continue in their quest for league points and positions on the ladder in the run-up to the Super 8s phase of the competition when they take on the Rovers at Langtree Park.And, as a thank you to Members for their continued support throughout the 2016 campaign, we want to give you the chance to bring a friend, loved one or someone who may not have experienced a game at Langtree Park before for the heaviliy disounted price of just £5.Seated Members are free to move to alternative seats (to allow the £5 ticket holder to sit with them) for no charge.Please note terms and conditions apply. Tickets subject to availability. The £5 ticket is limited to one per member.£5 Member tickets cannot be purchased online, but can be booked via the ticket office at Langtree Park or over the phone on verification of the member’s ticket. Call  01744 455052 to enquire or book. Full contact details must be provided for the recipent of the £5 ticket.last_img read more

Webbased intervention helps prevent depression among adolescents

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 2 2018Although up to 20 percent of adolescents experience a depressive episode each year, the medical community has struggled to implement programs that effectively prevent depression.Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have worked to fill this gap in pediatric primary care by conducting clinical trials to evaluate and compare interventions. A new study published in JAMA Network Open highlights the positive effect of one web-based intervention, called CATCH-IT, on preventing depressive episodes among adolescents most at risk.The multicenter, randomized clinical trial compared the CATCH-IT intervention – which consisted of depression-specific online learning modules, motivational interviews and coaching – with a control intervention. The control intervention consisted of general health education and was similarly delivered through online learning modules.More than 350 adolescents ages 13 to 18 from a mix of rural and urban areas were enrolled in the trial. Participants had either a history of depression or depressive symptoms, which were measured and assigned a score during screening. The researchers followed the participants for two years and tracked depressive episodes.While depressive symptoms were reduced across all participants, they found no difference between the groups, except for among higher-risk adolescents whose depressive symptoms scored high on baseline screening. Among this group, individuals who participated in the CATCH-IT intervention demonstrated greater benefit, achieving as much as 80 percent risk reduction for experiencing a depressive episode.”This study tells us that the online intervention works best for teens who are experiencing worse symptoms,” said Dr. Benjamin Van Voorhees, the principal investigator. “We hypothesized that there would be a benefit across all participants, but it is perhaps even more telling to see such a significant risk reduction among a smaller group of high-risk adolescents.”Van Voorhees, professor and head of pediatrics at the UIC College of Medicine, said that the results indicate to physicians and researchers that “when it comes to first-line programs for depression prevention, scalable solutions may need to be targeted to patients based on symptom severity, not prior history alone.”We need to move depression care away from reactive treatments to widespread prevention, but to be successful we need more research on which interventions work, and for what patients, in primary care settings,” Van Voorhees said. “This is the first study to test a depression prevention intervention in a primary care setting — primary care providers are likely to be the first people parents ask for help and they are also often among the first to identify worrisome trends towards depression.”Related StoriesCaregiver depression linked to increased emergency department visits for patients with dementiaTeens who can describe negative emotions are better protected against depressionCPAP treatment for sleep apnea can improve depression symptoms”Often primary care physicians recognize sub-threshold depressive symptoms in their adolescent patients but do not have an appropriate way to respond,” said Tracy Gladstone, co-principal investigator and associate director and senior research scientist at the Wellesley Centers for Women at Wellesley College. “Our hope is that this intervention can serve as a first-line, evidence-based response to support symptomatic teens before they develop a full-blown depressive illness.”For parents, Van Voorhees said the results should reinforce the need for action if teens display early signs of depression.”If their teen’s behavior is changing, parents should not wait to seek help,” he said. “While this study showed that high-risk teens benefited most from the online intervention, it also showed that participation in the study, regardless of which group, helped reduce depression symptoms. We know that simply engaging in physical activity, practicing intentional positivity and engaging with family, friends and activities can help teens ward off major depressive episodes.”CATCH-IT is an acronym for Competent Adulthood Transition with Cognitive behavioral Humanistic and Interpersonal Training and was designed to teach coping skills to teenagers and young adults. The intervention included 20 modules, 15 of which were for adolescents. The remaining five were for parents. The information in the modules was based primarily on previously validated educational materials on coping with depression and behavioral and interpersonal psychotherapy methods. Example modules included lessons on ways to escape negative thoughts, identifying triggers and habitual responses, and how to solve problems in stressful situations.The control group intervention consisted of 14 modules for adolescents and four modules for parents that provided instruction on general health topics, such as good nutrition, sleep, exercise and safety habits. Source:https://today.uic.edu/online-program-helps-prevent-teen-depressionlast_img read more

Encasing insecticides in microscopic plastic capsules could make them more toxic

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Feb 28 2019Encasing insecticides in microscopic plastic capsules – a common formulation for many pest sprays on the market – could lead to unintended consequences, according to a new study from Oregon State University.Environmental toxicologist Stacey Harper and her team found that a common insecticide in its “capsule suspension” formulation – with molecules of the active ingredient encapsulated in tiny, inert plastic pellets – was more toxic than the same amount of active ingredient delivered straight up in water.Their study is published in the journal Nanomaterials.Harper, an associate professor in the College of Agricultural Sciences and the College of Engineering, and her doctoral student Matthew Slattery studied a commercial pyrethroid-type insecticide with an encapsulated active ingredient, gamma-cyhalothrin. The insecticide is primarily used in the home and garden for ants, bed bugs, ticks and other insects.The capsules encasing the product’s active ingredient range from micron-sized (a human hair is 40-75 microns thick), to nanometer-sized, a thousand times smaller.”We want active ingredients to be relatively immobile, so they stay where they are applied,” Slattery said. “This particular active ingredient is designed to be hydrophobic, so it won’t be carried away with water. But if you encapsulate it, its hydrophobic nature is masked. The shell becomes a carrier device.”The researchers spun the off-the-shelf product in a centrifuge and sorted its capsules into two size classes. There was a wide range of sizes; most capsules were in the neighborhood of micron-sized, but some were nanometer-sized.They exposed a species of water flea (Ceriodaphnia dubia) to five doses of the pesticide’s active ingredient. One group got it in micron-sized capsules, and another group got the same dose in nanometer-sized capsules. As a control, a third group got the same dose of active ingredient, but it was not encapsulated.Related StoriesAXT enhances cellular research product portfolio with solutions from StemBioSysResearchers exploit nanoparticles to develop test for early detection of different diseasesAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyThe team found toxicity for the water fleas increased in the nanometer-sized capsules. The crustaceans were immobilized, leading to their death. The species lives in freshwater lakes, ponds and marshes and, due to its sensitivity to pollutants, is used in toxicity testing of waterways.”These water fleas are filter feeders; they swim through the water and grab particles out of the water, normally bacteria and other food floating around,” Slattery said. “In our study, it was the size of the particles that mattered. The nanometer-sized particles were in the ‘Goldilocks zone’ – large enough for the water flea to collect it but not so large so that it couldn’t ingest it.”Chemical manufacturers have offered encapsulated formulations of pesticides for more than 50 years, Harper said, because encapsulation is thought to improve the product’s dispersal and durability.”We need to think about considering encapsulation as an ingredient because of how it alters how the active ingredient interacts with the environment,” Harper said. “Currently, the only testing that’s done after the final formulation are hazards like corrosivity and flammability. But not toxicity. What we’ve found is that encapsulation makes a difference in toxicity and that it is size-dependent.”Harper, also an environmental engineer, studies the environmental effects of human-made nanoparticles–microscopic bits of matter engineered to have commercially useful properties. Nanoparticles are widely used in pharmaceuticals, pesticides and personal care products, but little is known about their long-term environmental or health effects. Source:https://today.oregonstate.edu/news/packaging-insecticides-tiny-capsules-may-make-them-more-toxiclast_img read more