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STORIES SOUGHT ON DONEGAL’S EXPERIENCE OF RURAL ELECTRIFICATION

first_imgDo you, or a relative, have a story to tell about the rural electrification scheme in Donegal?‘Then there was light’ promises to be a unique collection of stories by people recalling their memories and experiences of the Rural Electrification scheme which was rolled out from the late 1940s to the late 1970s across Ireland.It will provide a valuable snapshot of the time Ireland left the dark ages by allowing power and light into the midst of even the most remote communities.This book and radio documentary will celebrate the 70th anniversary of the commencement of the Rural Electrification scheme. The stories for the collection and radio programme are expected to provide a frank insight into the suspicions, worries and welcome the ESB’s light brigade faced as they began work on one of the most important undertakings in recent Irish history.The stories encapsulate and preserve the approach of a previous generation as it came to terms with the prospect of rapidly changing rural lifestyles.The collection and the editing for the book and documentary is being undertaken by authors and editors Joe Kearney and PJ Cunningham.To submit a story or memory, please email rural@esb.ie. All stories received will be considered for inclusion in the radio documentary and book and all contributions – whether in the book anthology or radio documentary or not – will be preserved in the ESB Archives as items of living history to assist future researchers and academic work. STORIES SOUGHT ON DONEGAL’S EXPERIENCE OF RURAL ELECTRIFICATION was last modified: June 15th, 2016 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Women’s Basketball Visits Indiana State Sunday

first_imgDrake (17-7, 12-0 MVC) cruised past Evansville, 101-50, Friday night. The Bulldogs had six players score in double figures with Sara Rhine (Eldon, Mo.) leading the team with 19 points. Becca Hittner (Urbandale, Iowa) scored 18 points, Maddy Dean (Walker, Iowa) added 13 points, Sammie Bachrodt (Wichita, Kan.) and Nicole Miller (Walker, Iowa) had 12 points each and rounding out the group was Brenni Rose (Shawnee, Kan.) with 10 points. Maddie Monahan (Silver Lake, Minn.) just missed double digits with eight points, but handed out a career-high nine assists. Dean flirted with a triple-double with nine rebounds and eight assists. TERRE HAUTE, Ind. – The Drake University women’s basketball team visits Indiana State in Missouri Valley Conference action Sunday afternoon. The game against the Sycamores will start at 1 p.m. broadcast on The Valley on ESPN3. As a team, the Bulldogs made a MVC and program-record 20 three-pointers, shot 69.1 percent (38-of-55) from the field and handed out 32 assists. Drake’s shooting percentage is the second-best single game mark in program history. The 32 assists are tied for fourth all-time in MVC history. Drake is just the third team in NCAA Division I to make 20 or more three-point field goals in a game this season joining FGCU & South Florida. Drake Game Notes Live Stats UNI defeated Indiana State (8-14, 6-5 MVC), 56-46, Friday night. The Sycamores pulled to within three points with three minutes left in the game, but the Panthers made seven free throws as part of a 9-2 closing run to earn the road win. Wendi Bibbins led Indiana State with 14 points while Ashli O’Neal added 11 points. Earlier this season, Drake never trailed in the 85-64 win over Indiana State at the Knapp Center.  center_img Story Links Live Audio ESPN3 Following Sunday’s game, Drake closes its three-game road trip at UNI on Feb. 16. Tipoff is scheduled for 7 p.m. at the McLeod Center. Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

Rare Moments of Glory: Planetary Scientists Admit Seeing “Lucky” Circumstances

first_img(Visited 37 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Why are we seeing young phenomena in the planets if they are billions of years old?  Some scientists are abandoning uniformitarian assumptions and admitting we are lucky to be witnessing them in “rare moments of glory.”In Nature this week, Maggie McKee interviewed scientists who are struggling with short-lived phenomena in the solar system.  The subtitle of her article, “Caught in the Act,” states, “We may be seeing some of the Solar System’s most striking objects during rare moments of glory.”  Her first two paragraphs elaborate why this is unsettling for some:Ever since Copernicus evicted Earth from its privileged spot at the centre of the Solar System, researchers have embraced the idea that there is nothing special about our time and place in the Universe. What observers see now, they presume, has been going on for billions of years — and will continue for eons to come.But observations of the distant reaches of the Solar System made in the past few years are challenging that concept. The most active bodies out there — Jupiter’s moon Io and Saturn’s moons Enceladus and Titan — may be putting on limited-run shows that humans are lucky to witness. Saturn’s brilliant rings, too, might have appeared relatively recently, and could grow dingy over time. Some such proposals make planetary researchers uncomfortable, because it is statistically unlikely that humans would catch any one object engaged in unusual activity — let alone several.It seems a bitter pill for some planetary scientists to “go against the grain of one of geology’s founding principles: uniformitarianism, which states that planets are shaped by gradual, ongoing processes,” she wrote.  Then she quoted Jeff More (NASA-Ames) who explained that “Geologists like things to be the same as they ever were” because it’s “philosophically comforting because you don’t have to assume you’re living in special times.”  Why that should be “comforting” was not explained.McKee zoomed into each of these phenomena for more detail about what makes them look young:Saturn’s rings:  The rings are 90% water ice but should be dirtier if they were old; “some planetary scientists say that the rings’ resplendence is hard to reconcile with a lifetime lasting billions of years.”  That’s why hypotheses of a recent encounter with an icy interloper that broke apart and became the rings within the last few million years (just 10% of Saturn’s assumed age) have been put forth.  An ad hoc solution like that, though raises other problems: all such candidate objects should have vanished 700 million years after the birth of the solar system, according to current theory.  Close flybys by Cassini in years to come may confirm whether billions of years of dirt is hiding in the B ring, McKee said, but one responded, “if the Cassini results point to a low mass for the rings, it will be a real mystery.”  This explanation, however, fails to explain why the thinner D, C, A, F, G, and E rings are so bright.Enceladus:  The geysers of Enceladus are another thing that can’t be old; “researchers have struggled to explain how it can sustain such activity” on the order of 16 gigawatts – 10 times the amount they can account for by internal radioactive heating.  “Several explanations have been put forward to account for this furious release of heat, but all rely on arguments that researchers are viewing the moon at a special time,” McKee said.  It’s difficult to keep the geysers going for 10 million years (1/450th the assumed age of the moon), let alone 4.5 billion.  One researcher who proposed a recent cracking from growing stresses in the crust has apparently been getting hard questions: “‘It seems like special pleading — we just happened to catch it in the act,’ says [Craig] O’Neill [Macquarie University, Sydney], echoing criticisms that he has heard when presenting the model at conferences.”  Nearby Mimas “should be producing more heat than Enceladus and it doesn’t, and we don’t really understand why,” O’Neill said.Io:  If Enceladus is a firefly, Io is a furnace, McKee wrote.  It gives off 90,000 gigawatts through its incessant volcanoes, “several times more than would be expected from the simplest models of tidal interactions between the moon and Jupiter.”  Again, it’s not that planetary scientists are unable to imagine scenarios in which we might be seeing Io at a special time; perhaps the moon’s orbital dance with the other moons makes it undergo periodic exaggerations of its eccentricity.  Even though this “would satisfy the data,” one planetologist said, when thinking about the peculiarities of Io and Enceladus, “it’s possible we simply don’t understand them.“Titan:  The largest moon of Saturn presents problems with both its atmosphere and surface.  Atmospheric theories are up in the air, because “the atmospheric methane — and its effects on the landscape — ought to be short-lived” in the range of a few tens of millions of years.  If sources of replenishment cannot be found (there are some disputed candidates thought to be ice volcanoes), it should have been long gone.  Jeff Moore “thinks that researchers are seeing Titan at a unique and geologically fleeting time.”  The question then becomes, why now, and what happened?  In Moore’s hypothesis, the sun warmed up to a tipping point a few tens or hundreds of millions of years ago, levitating the frozen nitrogen and methane into an atmosphere that “rained like hell” onto the surface, creating the erosional features seen today.  Ralph Lorenz [Johns Hopkins U] criticizes Moore’s view as “too simplistic” and pointed to “some evidence” (not mentioned in the article) that it would have taken billions of years to form Titan’s hydrocarbon-rich sand dunes.McKee ended with a quote from Lorenz: “I think we have to have a much more nuanced view of Titan through time.  Titan is bloody complicated.”It’s not complicated at all, if you subtract out the needless billions of years.  This article is important, in that in the 8 years of the ongoing Cassini mission to Cassini, and the 9 years since the end of the Galileo mission to Jupiter, scientists still have no answers to these age conundrums.  Their uniformitarian philosophy makes them uncomfortable with the facts their own eyes are beholding.  We should not be living in special times, but we appear to. (Understand that the Copernican principle does not mean that we are not special; see The Privileged Planet for corrective information.)Here’s a classic case of ad hoc explanation to force observations into a web of belief.  (This is called ‘special pleading’ in logic.)  If science were about honestly following the evidence where it leads, these scientists would have to conclude that the solar system is much younger than thought.  But they won’t do it, because they know Charlie D. (their idol) needs billions of years for life to evolve on Earth.  Failing to provide those annual sacrifices to the idol would get them excommunicated from the Church of Darwin.If Saturn’s rings, Enceladus, Io and Titan were the only problem worlds, they might have hope to rescue their beliefs someday.  Unfortunately, the problems mount for uniformitarianism when one considers Mercury, Venus, Earth, the Moon, Mars, Jupiter and its moons, Uranus and its moons and rings, Neptune and its moons and rings, Pluto and the trans-Neptunian objects, comets, asteroids, dust – the whole system.  There is hardly any planet or moon that met their uniformitarian expectations.  We call on them: please, dump the assumption of billions of years, and all these things will start making sense.  We do this out of sympathy for their discomfort, wishing them to sleep well for once.last_img read more

SA, UK boost for African farmers

first_img25 May 2006South Africa is a key partner in two new trade programmes designed to increase trade between SA and its neighbours and give emerging farmers in the region access to Europe’s supermarkets.The two programmes, supported by Britain’s Department for International Development (DFID) and backed by £4.5-million (R56-million) in British funding, were announced by British Prime Minister Tony Blair and South Africa President Thabo Mbeki following their meeting in London on Wednesday.According to the Cape Argus, the first, four-year programme will see British and South African supermarkets helping vegetable farmers in southern African countries to meet the quality standards required by EU markets.The programme aims to increase the sourcing of products by SA supermarkets from neighbouring countries by 30% by 2010, and to increase international retail sector purchases of high-value agricultural products from southern Africa by 5%.The second programme aims to reduce waiting times at border posts for both smaller traders and larger businesses moving goods between South Africa and Lesotho, South Africa and Mozambique, and Zambia and Zimbabwe.According to The Herald, the programme, backed by £500 000 (R6.2-million) of legal and practical support from Britain’s DFID, will also involve the SA Revenue Service and the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (Comesa).The programme aims to help cut waiting times at the three border posts – among the busiest in southern Africa – by at least 30% by 2010.“If Africa is to achieve the growth necessary to meet the key Millennium Development Goals of halving the number of people in poverty by 2015, the business environment must improve,” Mbeki and Blair said in a joint statement after their meeting.“Today’s trade agreement takes southern Africa another step towards a better business climate.”SouthAfrica.info reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Stanbank secures $100m European loan

first_img11 December 2009Standard Bank has signed a six-year US$100-million (about R747-million) loan agreement with three European development finance institutions. The loan will be used to fund infrastructure projects and project finance lending in Africa.The loan was coordinated by Germany’s Deutsche Investitions- und Entwicklungsgesellschaft (DEG), along with Netherlands’ FMO and the Austria’s Oesterreichische Entwicklungsbank (OeEB).“The deal will hopefully serve as a platform for future cooperation between Standard Bank, DEG and the other lenders across a range of different banking products and geographies,” said Standard Bank Africa CEO Clive Tasker in a statement last week.It is the first transaction between Standard Bank of South Africa and DEG, one of Europe’s largest development finance institutions.“The tranche, made available by several development finance institutions, will enable Standard Bank to finance investments in the infrastructure sector,” said DEG chairman Bruno Wenn.Boosting continental trade, investmentStandard Bank has been very active in securing international credit facilities to fund trade and investment on the African continent, especially in light of the global financial crisis.In April, it received a $400-million credit line from the International Finance Corporation’s Global Trade Liquidity Programme to support trade in sub-Saharan Africa.In September, it raised a further US$1-billion loan facility with four major Chinese banks: the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China (Macau), Bank of China, China Development Bank, and China CITIC Bank.And, in October, it signed a further $150-million loan agreement with the Japan Bank for International Cooperation to boost trade on the continent.SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Is Real-Time Search Still Waiting for Mainstream Adoption?

first_img8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Real-time search is very different from regular search. After studying about 1 million queries on real-time search engine Collecta, researchers at Pennsylvania State University came to the conclusion that – relative to regular search – users of real-time search engines tend to search less for adult topics and focus more on technology, entertainment and politics. This, according to the researchers, reflects “both the temporal nature of the queries and, perhaps, an early adopter user base.”API Accounts for Most QueriesAccording to the data the research team collected, most real-time queries come from third-party applications and don’t happen on the search engine’s own page. On Collecta, API queries account for about 60% of all queries and we’ve heard similar – and often even higher – numbers from other real-time search engines. As these API-based queries are often repeated multiple times throughout the day, real-time search engines also tend to see fewer unique queries than regular search engines.Top Queries The researchers also collected a list of the most popular queries on Collecta during a 190-day period at the end of last year. This data shows that the typical queries on real-time search engines are quite different from what we would expect to see on a regular search engine. Even the most popular search term (“naomi watts”), only accounted for 0.003% of all queries. According to Hitwise, “facebook” is currently the most popular search term on all the major search engines (Google, Yahoo, Bing) and accounts for between 1.17% of all queries on Google to 2.6% of all queries on Bing. Where’s the Porn?As the researchers note, Collecta registered almost no searches that were pornographic in nature. “Sex” was the ninth most popular search term and only accounted for 0.002% of all queries.Early AdoptersAs the researchers rightly note, the list of most popular search queries on Collecta reflects the early-adopter nature of the service. The fact that the second-most popular query was “jQuery CSS” is a good example for the nature of real-time searches. To some degree, of course, these numbers are also biased towards Collecta’s users and the kind of applications that have been developed on top of Collecta’s API. It will be interesting to see what these numbers look like by the end of this year. If “jQuery CSS” is still in the top 10 of most often used queries, we can safely assume that Collecta – and maybe real-time search as a whole – hasn’t reached a mainstream audience yet. Tags:#Real-Time Web#Statistics#web A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting frederic lardinois Related Posts last_img read more