AllianceND sparks dialogue around campus

first_imgWhen an offensive “Mobile Party” comic strip was published in the Observer on Jan. 13, the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning community at Notre Dame and the University’s unrecognized gay-straight alliance, AllianceND, was thrust to the forefront of a national issue.“It gave us the opportunity to start the discussions,” AllianceND officer Jessica Mahon, a senior, said.Later that month, the group helped organize a massive protest on campus to urge the University administration to both grant AllianceND official club status and add sexual orientation to the nondiscrimination clause.“The demonstration that happened in January was maybe the marker of my Notre Dame experience,” Mahon said. “It really kept up my faith in the Notre Dame student body that the response was really positive on campus.”AllianceND officer junior Chris Collins said the panel discussions that followed the comic’s publication and several individual meetings with top administration officials, including University President Fr. John Jenkins, have been mostly productive.“There have been a lot of discussions since the Mobile Party Comic Strip, and I’ve been to a few of them and from what I’ve heard they’ve all been very successful,” he said.Senior and AllianceND officer Melanie LeMay said the Student Activities Office (SAO) has made a decision and is waiting until all club applications are reviewed to give its decision.In an e-mail, student programs coordinator Mary Kate Havlik said she helps “to facilitate the prospective club application process for all clubs,” but did not comment directly on AllianceND’s pending application.“Our primary concerns [when we met with Fr. Jenkins] were the non-discrimination clause and the approval of AllianceND as a club, both of which are ways we feel the University can show its acceptance of [LGBTQ] students and their allies on campus,” LeMay said.LeMay noted Saint Mary’s College across the street from Notre Dame already has both a gay-straight alliance (SAGA) and has added sexual orientation to their nondiscrimination clause.“The administration has definitely been made aware that Saint Mary’s, which is also a Holy Cross college, has both sexual orientation in the clause and a gay-straight alliance,” she said.LeMay said the administration has cited concern about the legal ramifications of adding sexual orientation to the nondiscrimination clause, noting partner benefits as one legal implication.AllianceND officer senior Patrick Bears said the panel discussions and meetings with administration officials were a step in the right direction, but the actions were ultimately inconsequential.“I’m not going be critical for the University for actually trying to do something, it’s just they’re doing as little as they potentially can,” he said. “They’re trying to do everything they can without actually doing anything about the club itself.”Mahon said she wanted to be optimistic about the club’s application, but also noted it was the eleventh time the club had applied for official status in the past 13 years.“We want to be really optimistic, but we also recognize that it may not happen,” she said. “I think the biggest indicator that [we might not get it] is the administration has being making really conscious efforts to meet with us to see how they can improve the framework that they use.”Mahon said gaining official club status would be incredibly helpful to the group and boost its profile on campus.“Right now it’s just some friends who meet and discuss issues. It would be really beneficial to have a set club, have a set time when we could meet, have a room where we can meet and to be able to advertise to students that these resources are out there,” she said.Mahon said the club’s unofficial status had kept it underground for years, and many students who could benefit from the group’s resources might not know it exists.“Right now, students that could really need the help or the resources sometimes don’t know what goes on,” she said. “It’s all word of mouth, so there’s a really possible chance that we’re missing people who could benefit from the club.”In the past, the administration has pointed to Core Council as a resource for LGBTQ students. But Collins said Core Council, of which both LeMay and Bears are also members, does not give students enough control.“I think one of the key things is [AllianceND] gives students the ability to take part in the decision making process,” Collins said. “We’d have our own funds and be able to set our own events, whereas with Core Council they’re all kind of set by [the Office of Student Affairs].”LeMay said Core Council’s structure does not allow many students to join who would want to.“I think AllianceND would be a important supplement to Core Council because Core Council is a closed group and only has eight student members,” she said.Bears said graduate students are shut out of Core Council, and that they do not have a gay-straight alliance for themselves.“There’s no kind of outreach for them,” he said.Bears also said it was not just students who felt that they needed to stay closeted.“There’s definitely fear among teachers regarding the subject material that they can teach and their personal lives and whether they have to remain closeted in order to keep their jobs,” he said.Collins, who is the only officer in the group that will still be enrolled at Notre Dame next year, said the group will continue to apply for club status if they are denied later this month.“If we don’t get status we will be applying again next year, I can pretty much guarantee that. If we do get club status that would kind of be a whole different ball game,” he said.Collins said AllianceND’s probationary first year would include hosting regular meetings and sponsoring a few events in conjunction with Core Council.Despite some setbacks, the AllianceND officers said the response on campus has been very positive since the publication of the offensive comic. Mahon said the work of many tenured faculty members who know their jobs are safe has been “phenomenal” in supporting the group.Nevertheless, the group members did say they were concerned about some of the more hateful reactions they have received around campus.“There have been a reemergence of the ‘Gay? Go to Hell’ T-shirts from two years ago, and from what I’m aware there have actually been more of them than there were just my sophomore year,” Bears said.last_img read more

Lecture emphasizes advantages of fair trade

first_imgFair trade does not just mean fair wages, John Taylor, a member of Catholic Relief Services (CRS), said Tuesday.The lecture titled “A Piece of Fair Trade” focused on the benefits of fair trade among Central American countries.The talk was held in Carroll Auditorium at Saint Mary’s.  “For each of us who have jobs, or for each of us who are working within a structure … we really care individually about each of these steps,” Taylor said. Taylor, along with fellow CRS member Jessica Howell, said fair trade is beneficial for impoverished nations. “What’s different about the fair trade system is that it’s added value,” Howell said. Taylor said the beans are sent to an exporter, who works to find a place to sell the beans.  Howell encouraged students to get involved in fair trade practices. Other ways students can become involved, Howell said, is to discuss fair trade with families and friends, change the purchasing practices of stores in the area and call on the College to provide fair trade products. “Fair trade is to make sure that these five principals are not shoved aside in order to provide the lowest price for the consumer,” he said. Taylor also said there were five main principals in the fair trade system. Those principals include fair wages, cooperative workplaces, long-term relationships, good working conditions and environmental sustainability.  A broker then works with the exporter to connect with an importer, who brings the coffee beans to the roaster. After the beans are roasted, they are taken to a distributor, who ensures the beans are put in a store to be sold. A retailer then sells the beans to a consumer, and the revenue from the beans is distributed throughout each member of the chain. “It’s pretty powerful to know that when you buy a cup of coffee, or a chocolate bar, or a handcraft that is fair trade certified, you know because there is a fair trade certification system that what you are buying with that money is again not just a living wage for someone, but that there is no exploitative child labor, no harsh environmental conditions,” Howell said.  Taylor said typically, the goal for the consumer for any transaction is to pay as little as possible for the products purchased. However, in a fair trade system, consumers look at the wages that the producer will receive instead of the cost of the product. Howell said fair trade is much more than just creating fair wages for small farmers. Howell said the fair trade system is far less complex and provides more value to the products.center_img Taylor said CRS began to assist refugees coming out of Europe in 1933. Today, CRS focuses on international aid and development.  She also said selling fair trade products and hosting fair trade sales around holidays would be beneficial for fair trade communities. According to Taylor, CRS currently is working in over 100 countries throughout the world to promote fair trade. According to Taylor, free trade is far more complex than fair trade. Taylor explained the process of free, or conventional, trade in relationship to coffee farmers. Coffee farmers begin the process of free trade by producing coffee beans. The beans are then sent to intermediaries, who are responsible for negotiating the price with the farmer. Once the intermediaries agree on a price, the coffee beans are then taken to a processing mill. There, the hull of the bean is removed. “After all, the bottom line is to pay as little as possible, regardless of what the producers or the farmer gets out of it,” Taylor said. According to Howell, there are a variety of ways to encourage fair trade within local communities. Howell said to organize fair trade tastings, film nights or informational events.  Howell encouraged students to purchase fair trade products. Another way to become involved is to learn more about fair trade. “Fair trade ultimately is the realization that there’s a person behind every item that we purchase, and how we choose to buy that item affects that person in a positive or a negative way,” Howell said. Howell added that fair trade worked to strengthen communities by utilizing all of these principals. According to Howell, fair trade also begins with the farmer. After the beans are raised, they are sent to a cooperative, which is a democratically run resource that allows the farmers to receive more money per pound of product. The beans are then taken to a processing mill and then sold to coffee companies. From there, consumers have the capability to purchase the product. Additionally, Howell discussed the ways in which students can participate in the fair trade system.last_img read more

ND kicks off 2014 season with changes

first_imgNotre Dame students began this year’s football season with ponchos and umbrellas, cheering the Irish to victory in the face of stormy weather and recent game-day changes made by the University.This weekend, Notre Dame not only debuted uniforms from Under Armour and a new turf field, but also instituted a system which allows students to forgo the traditional ticket booklet in favor of electronic tickets on their smartphones.Emily McConville Freshman Enrique Pajuelo said he appreciated the convenience of the “etickets,” even though the new procedure was not completely foolproof.“I’ve been told by sophomores that [in the past] you had to carry all the tickets with you all the time, so with the phone it was easier, but the main problem was that almost all iPhones run out of battery really fast,” he said.Although she agreed the electronic tickets were convenient, senior Annie Plachta said she was disappointed that she would now be unable to have a booklet as a reminder of her last football season at Notre Dame.“I have three ticket booklets from freshman, sophomore and junior year, so I kind of wanted the fourth one to complete the four years,” Plachta said. “It’s kind of sad to have the eticket instead of the booklet.”The new Under Armour uniforms, on the other hand, were a good change, junior football captain and defensive lineman Sheldon Day said.“[The new uniforms were] excellent, especially with the nice, tight fit around the body. You’re just feeling good,” he said.The changes made to the uniforms were not obvious from the student section, however, junior Abbey Dankoff said.“I don’t think there’s that much difference,” she said. “If there was, you couldn’t tell. I’m pretty pumped about the Shamrock Series uniforms though. I think Under Armour has taken the design to a new level.”While the switch to Under Armour is not necessarily apparent from the student section, it is very clear while shopping at the bookstore, Plachta said.“What’s in the bookstore this year is so much better than what they’ve had in the past,” she said. “I don’t remember Adidas having anything cool like [what they have now], especially for women. The women’s stuff tends to be subpar to the men’s, and I thought Under Armour did a really good job.”As for field changes, Day said the new turf made play easier.“Definitely, feeling faster, quicker, more explosive is a good feeling,” he said.Freshman Ivan Carballude said it was unfortunate that Notre Dame had to give up the traditional grass.“I liked having the grass,” he said. “We have such an old stadium, and it’s so traditional … having the grass, and being one of the last teams to have grass was really nice.”Dankoff, though, said the switch to turf was long overdue.“I think that it just allows for a better-played game,” she said. “The athletes don’t have to worry about slipping in mud, don’t have to worry about puddles on the field. … It’s kind of ridiculous. We were one of the only teams to still have grass, and it’s just the way the game is evolving. It’s not that it takes away from the tradition of the stadium.”Junior Megan McCuen echoed the thoughts of many students regarding the new turf and game-day changes in general.“I thought it would look worse with the turf instead of the grass since grass is such a tradition, and it’s so natural — a Notre Dame kind of thing,” she said. “But I guess it proved that even though there are changes, change can be good.”Tags: 2014, Changes, etickets, football, Under Armourlast_img read more

Saint Mary’s lecture series to celebrate St. Teresa of Avila

first_imgKeri O’Mara | The Observer The Center for Spirituality (CFS) at Saint Mary’s announced its spring 2015 lecture series entitled “Saint Teresa of Avila: Carmelite Mystic and Doctor of the Church.”The series will include two talks and one panel discussion, marking the 500th anniversary of Saint Teresa’s birth. According to a press release, the Saint Mary’s College Annual Endowed Lecture Series Fund will sponsor the lectures, which are free and open to the public and will take place in the Vander Vennet Theatre.According to Michelle Egan, associate director of the CFS, the center hosts a series each fall and spring semester encompassing a specific topic or theme.This spring series will follow the 2014 lecture series, “Unitas, Veritas, Caritas: Catholicism and the Liberal Arts and Sciences,” which explored the relationship of faith and reason across disciplines.“When deciding on a theme, we consider the current contemporary religious and theological issues, or if there are any significant milestones within the Church,” Egan said. “The 500th anniversary of Teresa of Avila’s birth is one such milestone.”While other CFS lecture series have focused on larger concepts, such as “facets of justice” or “leadership of Catholic women both past and current,” Egan said the spring 2015 series will discuss rather particular aspects of Teresa’s life and work.The first lecture, titled “Teresa of Avila: Prayer is an Adventure in Love,” will take place Feb. 17 at 7:30 p.m.“Our first lecturer, Keith Egan, Aquinas chair of Catholic theology emeritus at Saint Mary’s, will explore Teresa’s thoughts on prayer and love because for this saint and doctor of the Church, she spent her life searching for God through prayer,” Egan said. “For her, prayer is an ‘exercise in love.’”On March 3 at 7:30 p.m., the second lecture, “Teresa the Theologian on the Human Person as Capax Dei” will feature a visiting scholar from Fairfield University.“Elizabeth Dreyer, religious studies professor at Fairfield University, will consider Teresa’s work as an incarnational theologian and how that has or hasn’t prospered in the history of Christian theology and spirituality,” Egan said.The third and final lecture of the series will feature a panel of both undergraduate and post-graduate students from Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame, titled “Teresa and Us: The Significance of Teresa of Avila for Young Catholic Women Today.” The panel will take place March 19 at 7:30 p.m.“Our final event in the series will be a panel discussion about the significance of Teresa for today’s young Catholic women,” Egan said. “Teresa was certainly a leader in the Church, she was a religious founder, a reformer, and her writings have been, and continue to be, very influential to theologians.”“How she is a source of wisdom is just as relevant today to young women as she was several hundred years ago,” she said.According to Egan, this series furthers the CFS’s purpose, as the organization was established in 1984 as a center to “build a theologically well-grounded spirituality among members of the College and greater South Bend community,” according to the press release.Egan said the events also support the religious and academic missions of the College.“World-renowned scholars come to Saint Mary’s to share their wisdom on contemporary religious issues and to address broader issues of how faith and reason interact,” Egan said.Senior Madison Maidment said she enjoys having the opportunity to hear such scholars discuss aspects of spirituality that are not often elaborated upon in religion courses as fully as possible.“I remember a lot of my friends who are nursing majors were really interested in the fall series because it had lectures concerning things like health care professions and biology,” Maidment said. “This spring series interests me a little more because it gives students a chance to get to know a saint on a more personal, relatable level, and I think that’s an awesome opportunity.“… But both series this school-year have brought topics to the table that aren’t often discussed in our daily lives, and I think these unique themes appeal to a wide variety of students.”Tags: Center for Spirituality, Center for Spirituality lecture series, CFS lecture series, Michelle Egan, Saint Teresa of Avila, Saint Teresa of Avila: Carmelite Mystic and Doctor of the Churchlast_img read more

Notre Dame Hall Council to select Hall of the Year

first_imgTags: Hall of the year, residence halls, Residence Life Hall of the Year presentations, which give hall presidents and vice presidents the chance to summarize the activities and condition of their dorm, begin next week. These presentations make up more than half the criteria for the Hall of the Year selection.Senior Michael Wajda, co-chair of Hall Presidents Council, said 65 percent of Hall of the Year deliberations are based on next week’s presentations, in which hall presidents recap their dorm’s activities over the last year with respect to three categories: heart, mind and body.“Over the course of the next week, all of the dorms are going to be giving their presentations, and they’ll be graded on the mind, heart and body categories, but they will also be graded on how they have worked to grow as a community holistically,” he said. “We’ll judge how they’ve worked to include all members of the community, and what sort of sustained unique impact they’ve had this year.”Wajda said 5 percent of the deliberations is based on the dorm’s signature event, which is hosted by the dorm and open to all of campus. The remaining 30 percent is based on monthly Rockne presentations.“These presentations are snapshots that the presidents provide each month, just a listing of what they’ve done which includes events and a couple of pictures,” Wadja said.“We really look for four things in the Rockne presentations,” he said. “We look for how they’ve advanced the mental aspect of dorm life, which can be anything from cultural events, academic events and sustainability events. We also look at how they advance the body of the dorm, so that includes inter-hall athletics and social events.“Finally, we look at how they advance the heart of dorm community that include the service and liturgical aspects,” he said. “There’s a reflection and goals aspect of the presentation where we ask them to see where they want to go from here in the next month.”Kathleen Clark, Hall Presidents Council co-chair, said it is impossible to judge each dorm in a vacuum.“Each of the 29 halls is Hall of the Year in some way,” she said. “So really what we’re looking for is to see that each residence hall has been the best possible version of itself.”Michael Wajda said the Hall of the Year selection is made by a group of nine judges.“These nine judges are the two Hall Presidents Council co-chairs, the council finance chair, the two HPC social chairs, the athletic chair, one senior member of judicial council and two senators.“The judges represent a really diverse group of people,” he said. “We have a good mix of all the quads, all the grades and both genders. It’s a really fun mix of people and we’ve really enjoyed working together.”Wajda said the senators do not have to judge their own dorms.“One of the things we’ve changed is the institution of a recusal process,” Wajda said. “If I felt like I couldn’t be fair in judging Duncan, I could recuse myself without hurting their overall grade.”Clark said Notre Dame residential life holds a special place in her heart.“I showed up for freshman orientation at 2011 and I knew I wanted to be a part of hall council,” Clark said. “I had the good fortune of being on hall presidents council last year and, while I really love and cherish the Farley community, I relished the opportunity to work with each of the 29 communities on campus.”Clark said the most rewarding aspect of her position as Hall Presidents Council co-chair is seeing the hard work the presidents and vice presidents put in to improve student life for those who live in their dorm.“As co-chair you get a glimpse into each community, and that has been a tremendous gift,” she said. “It has made me cherish my Notre Dame education even more because the quality of residential life here is so special.”Wajda said there are several concrete prizes for winning Hall of the Year, including a plaque for the winning dorms, a dome dance and a monetary prize. Two dome dances are given out, one to the overall Hall of the Year and one to either the Women’s Hall of the Year or the Men’s Hall of the Year — whichever is the opposite sex of the overall winner.Clark said the biggest and most meaningful prize for winning Hall of the Year is the title and recognition.“It’s something special to be able to put Hall of the Year on the banner outside your dorm,” Clark said. “It’s all about the bragging rights.”Clark said the selection process is difficult because every dorm is worthy of Hall of the Year.“We recognize there are 29 outstanding communities on campus that are lead by 29 outstanding presidents, vice presidents, and communities,” Clark said.“I think what is valuable in having Hall of the Year awards is that it continues to affirm the importance of residence life here at Notre Dame,” she said. “It is worth celebrating a good, strong community. That’s one of the things that makes Notre Dame different. You hear constantly that people come here for the residential structure, and we have a role in perpetuating that importance and strengthening our communities into families.”Wajda said Notre Dame residential life is unique in that students of all years are living and learning together.“You’re a senior living next to freshman and across from sophomores, and you’re all called Highlanders or Vermin, or Lions, or The Finest,” he said. “It’s a system that most other colleges don’t have, and having Hall of the Year lets us say that Notre Dame residential life is something special, something unique and something meaningful.”last_img read more

Students attend Donald Trump rally

first_imgThe night before the pivotal Indiana primary, GOP frontrunner Donald Trump filled the Century Center in downtown South Bend to capacity. “And now the biggie is in Indiana. If we win in Indiana, it’s over,” Trump said in his speech Monday night.Rachel O’Grady | The Observer His prediction came true, as he won 53.3 percent of the Republican vote in Indiana the next day, leading Sen. Ted Cruz to drop out of the race. “We then focus on Hillary, and that’s going to be fun,” Trump said. “But remember, we started with 17 and one by one by one they went off. A governor, a senator, a senator, a governor. They didn’t know what the hell happened.”Wednesday afternoon, Ohio Gov. John Kasich also dropped out of the race, leaving Trump as the presumptive Republican nominee. Senior Steve Trottier was in attendance at Monday’s rally and said everything happened as he expected. “Ultimately, it was what I expected,” Trottier said. “Trump fulfills America’s thirst for the reality TV show style of politician.  He disdains any real substance and embraces the dramatic, often outrageous phrases one would expect behind a hashtag on Twitter.”Trump was 45 minutes late to the rally, which Trottier said built up the anticipation amongst the audience. “Trump was late and the anticipation was definitely mounting for him,” he said. “As I waited I spoke to a few supporters of Trump who said they couldn’t identify with ‘lyin’ Ted’ and wanted a president who would stick up for America.”Trottier said he saw the audience consisted mostly of white, working class individuals. “Unlike what I had seen in the media, I didn’t notice any protesters or agitators — most had been restricted to outside the convention center,” he said.Rachel O’Grady | The Observer Some of Trump’s major points included his endorsements from former Notre Dame football coach Lou Holtz and former Notre Dame basketball coach Digger Phelps, according to Trottier. “He did his usual song and dance about winning and mentioned ‘lyin’ Ted’ every chance he got, which was met with overwhelming boos from the audience,” Trottier said. “The only real substance Trump eventually offered came in the form of building a wall and stopping America’s abuse in international trade deals.”Trottier had also been in attendance for both the Bernie Sanders rally and the Ted Cruz rally on the two days prior. “I personally don’t support Trump.  I was able to attend the Cruz, Bernie and Trump rallies this past week,” he said. “I went to the rally to hear Trump unfiltered by the media and experience the rally for myself. The difference between the Cruz and Bernie rallies and Trumps rally was like night and day. Cruz and Bernie both presented substantive policy plans to address issues such as dwindling wages, while Trump’s was devoid of any.” As far as the political climate on campus, Trottier said there seems to be a clear divide. “I can’t speak for all Notre Dame students, but I do think people are very split on the candidate,” he said “I have not experienced any uncomfortable encounters talking or debating about the issues and candidates which is ultimately good. I think people at Notre Dame are willing to listen to each other and walk away disagreeing, but with a better understanding of where each person stands.”Tags: 2016 Election, Donald Trump, Donald Trump rally, Trumplast_img read more

Students reflect on activities as “Welcome Weekend” concludes

first_imgWelcome Weekend drew to a close Monday, concluding orientation activities for incoming first-year and transfer students.Junior Prathm Juneja, student government chief of staff, said he thought this year’s Welcome Weekend staff and student government volunteers did a great job of creating an “all-inclusive” environment for new students.“I think what we did best was trying to establish a welcoming, incoming connection individually to really show that student government really cares about our students,” he said. “Everyone here can be really connected and it should be an opportunity for everyone to get to know each other.”Freshman Carmen Bolivar, also a resident of Lewis Hall, said moving into her dorm helped her feel welcomed during her first few days at Notre Dame. Her older brother knew a sophomore Welcome Weekend ambassador in Lewis, who she met during the weekend.“I think just seeing her and starting to meet everyone in Lewis was super fun,” Bolivar said. “I think just having that as my first experience coming into Notre Dame really made me feel more in the family and really connected to everyone.”Freshman Carina Walton-Roberts, a resident of Lewis Hall, said her favorite event was the class photo.“I liked Domerfest but I think the most fun would probably be the class picture that we took,” she said. “They took it from the football field and we stood like the band does in the ND shape.”Sophomore Dea Meissner, said she and other transfer students were divided into small groups which allowed them to get to know other students. Meissner said it was especially helpful for those who were not Gateway students — students who enroll at Holy Cross College during their first year of studies and transfer to Notre Dame during their sophomore year.“I think they did a good job of breaking people into small groups because I think the hardest part is no one knows each other or you’re in a situation where half of the people are Gateway and you’re not Gateway,” she said.Sophomore Kyla Kosidowski, a Gateway transfer student, said each small group was led by upperclassmen who had transferred to Notre Dame in previous years.“They were really willing to help us with anything we needed, and … they were just more than happy to help us with anything that we had questions on,” she said. “So that’s been nice, [having] a support system from people who’ve already been through the same thing we have.”Junior Margaret Meserve, Cavanaugh Hall’s Welcome Weekend co-captain, said it was rewarding to see the event come together this weekend.“  … You go into things like this with a little bit of anxiety because it’s kind of your baby,” she said. “We’ve been working on it since the spring so I think we started in April. It’s a long time of planning … but it really just ended up being a success so I think it went really well.”Tags: Class of 2021, Welcome Weekend 2017last_img read more

Snite Museum exhibit focuses on African experience

first_imgThe Snite Museum of Art’s new fall exhibit stretches through numerous rooms with large paintings, sculptures and even electric metal signs. Biographies of the many artists adorn the walls alongside their respective artwork, giving more of a story to each piece. Each work of art tells some kind of rich and brilliant story, typically etched into the history of the black experience.This exhibit, entitled “Solidary and Solitary: the Joyner/Giuffrida Collection,” was brought to the Snite Museum by curators Christopher Bedford and Katy Siegel. It celebrates black artists and will be up for viewing in the museum until December 15.According to a press release from the Snite Museum, this is a historical exhibition that offers a new perspective on issues people of African descent have faced throughout history.“This will be the first large-scale public exhibition to bring together a vital lineage of visionary black artists,” the press release said. “This exhibition offers a new perspective on the critical contribution black artists have made to the evolution of visual art from the 1940s through the present day.”Gina Costa, marketing and public relations manager for the Snite Museum, said this exhibition has been on display around the country and the former director of the Snite, Charles Loving, worked with the Baltimore Museum of Art to get “Solidary and Solitary” to Notre Dame. However, because of space limitations, the Snite Museum can only show part of the exhibit.“It was a great opportunity for the museum to display an exhibition that offers a new perspective of the critical contribution of black artists,” Costa said. “These works reveal how African artists have used abstraction as a visual vocabulary to talk about the issue of being black, social struggles and the international African diaspora.”The exhibit displays works from a wide variety of artists using several different mediums. Some include oil canvas paintings, re-draped canvas, sculptures, found fabric and more.Costa said the most notable artists are Sam Gilliam, Norman Lewis and Kevin Beasley.Quoting the Snite press release, Costa said “the entire collection is really of an unparalleled level and shows the power of abstract art as a profound political choice rather than just a stylistic preference for generations of artists.”According to the press release, “[the exhibit] will reveal a rich and complex history woven from the threads of artistic debates about how to embody blackness, social struggle and change.”Museum visitors will have the opportunity to meet the curators, Bedford and Siegel, during a free public reception with refreshments on the evening of Oct. 26.Costa also said she wanted to emphasize the accessibility of the Snite Museum to Notre Dame students.“Students often don’t know that the museum is free and open to the public. It’s their museum.”Editor‘s note: A previous version of this story incorrectly stated the role of Christopher Bedford and Katy Siegel in the Snite Museum’s new exhibition. Bedford and Siegel are the curators of the exhibition. The Observer regrets this error.Tags: Snite Museum, Snite Museum of Art, Solidary and Solitarylast_img read more

Mendoza focuses on inequality during annual Ethics Week

first_imgThe theme for the third-annual Notre Dame Ethics Week, hosted by the Mendoza College of Business and the Notre Dame Deloitte Center for Ethical Leadership, was “Economic Inequality: On Campuses, in Communities and at Companies.”Past themes have included “Lead Local, Lead Global” and “Sports and the Common Good.”Ethics Week coordinator Brian Levey explained the reasoning behind the theme for the speaker series. “Income inequality, or economic inequality more broadly, has worked its way into the national conversation, and so it seemed like the right time for us to focus on the issue, especially as a Catholic business school,” Levey said in an email. The event spanned from Tuesday until Friday with one speaker or panel each day. Panelists and speakers were chosen with the intent of displaying perspectives of economic inequality from a variety of angles, Levey said. The panelists consisted of both faculty and staff on campus and visiting speakers. “We looked for experts in their respective fields who would have something [interesting to] share with us about economic inequality,” Levey said. Speakers included Virginia Eubanks, associate professor of political science at the University of Albany, SUNY, and a panel featuring panel admissions director Bob Mundy, director of Financial Aid Mary Nucciarone and former director of the Office of Student Enrichment Marc Burdell. Professor Dan Graff, director of the Higgins Labor Program also spoke on a panel with colleague and assistant professor of management Charlice Hurst. The week concludes Friday with speaker Steven Clifford, author of “The CEO Pay Machine: How it Trashes America and How to Stop It.”Graff explained that he, along with Hurst, is currently developing a just wage framework and online tool to calculate fair wages. The project pulls people together from different disciplines across campus, Graff said. “[Hurst] and I are representing our working group that has sociologists, economists, historians like me, management professors like her and people from the law school,” Graff said. “It’s kind of an attempt to bring together folks from different disciplines and see if we could come up with an answer to the question: What makes any given wage just or unjust?”Graff said this year’s theme is the most pressing public issue of our time, which is why he is involved in just wage research. “I think ethics should inform any of our endeavors and I certainly think that in the business world, it’s really critical because so often we as a culture or as a society are told to strip ethics from questions of the economy or business, as if you can or should just apply a monetary lens to things,” Graff said. “So I’m really grateful that Mendoza sponsors Ethics Week in order to reassert that we can’t separate ethics from economics or any other human endeavor, and I am particularly gratified that they are doing economic inequality right now.”Graff said he believes it is important for students to attend events outside of the classroom, such as the Ethics Week lectures. “It’s important to make sure that ethics is at the foundation of what students do … it prompts them to think about their own intellectual and maybe career interests in life in light of a different lens or through a different lens,” Graff said. Levey also expressed the importance of students learning about issues such as economic equality. “Our students are smart enough to have been admitted to many other colleges, but for good reasons they chose to come here,” he said. “Exposure to issues like economic inequality is part of their Notre Dame education. If they haven’t confronted it already, they will. In fact, some are living it. What do they think about it?  What are they going to do about it?” Tags: Economic Inequality, Ethics week, mendoza college of businesslast_img read more

Hot Shot! Jim Parsons Visits the Mothers and Sons Family

first_img Bobby Steggert Mothers and Sons Jim Parsons Star Files Tyne Daly View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on June 22, 2014 Related Shows Frederick Weller View All (4) Ding-dong. Who’s there? Why, it’s Jim Parsons! The star of HBO’s The Normal Heart stopped by the Golden Theatre to pay a visit to Mothers and Sons stars Tyne Daly, Bobby Steggert, Frederick Weller and Grayson Taylor on May 14. The Tony-nominated play by Terrence McNally centers on Katharine (Daly), a mother who turns up at the door of her son’s former lover twenty years after her son’s death. After witnessing the heartbreaking and funny story, the Big Bang Theory fave and Harvey alum stopped backstage to greet the cast. Check out these photos from the Emmy winner’s visit, then catch Mothers and Sons on Broadway!last_img read more